Microneedles: Progress in developing new technology for painless drug delivery

P. Shivanand, P. Binal, D. Viral

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advances in the processing of materials on a micro-scale have led to the development and introduction of devices that employ very small needles. That has significant potential in devices for diagnostics, healthcare monitoring and drug delivery by mechanically perforating the outer skin layer and allowing for transdermal drug absorption or fluid sampling. These processing techniques incorporate one or more technologies that enable the precise machining, extrusion, casting, and/or forming of from one to an array or grid of microneedles. Evolving microneedle systems will be well positioned to address a significant segment of the large -molecule biological drugs expected to emerge from the convergence of automated discovery and genome mapping. To overcome the problems of oral route skin has been extensively studied as an alternative route of drug delivery. Skin is a large and easily accessible organ that can be readily used to administer drugs into the blood capillaries lying just tens of microns beneath the skin's surface. Despite the advantages offered by skin for drug delivery, clinical drug delivery through the skin is severely limited by the presence of the top most layers of dead cells called the stratum corneum. This layer is just 10-20 μm in depth, but is the rate-limiting barrier and only allows low molecular weight molecules with moderate oil and water solubility to diffuse through. This in turn restricts the drugs that can be delivered via the skin into a very narrow range. As a result, presently only thirteen active molecules are approved for delivery through the skin by the Food and Drug Administration.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1279-1282
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of PharmTech Research
Volume1
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Technology
Skin
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Cutaneous Administration
Skin Absorption
Equipment and Supplies
Drug Monitoring
Chromosome Mapping
United States Food and Drug Administration
Solubility
Cornea
Needles
Oils
Molecular Weight
Delivery of Health Care
Water

Cite this

Shivanand, P. ; Binal, P. ; Viral, D. / Microneedles: Progress in developing new technology for painless drug delivery. In: International Journal of PharmTech Research. 2009 ; Vol. 1, No. 4. pp. 1279-1282.
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abstract = "Advances in the processing of materials on a micro-scale have led to the development and introduction of devices that employ very small needles. That has significant potential in devices for diagnostics, healthcare monitoring and drug delivery by mechanically perforating the outer skin layer and allowing for transdermal drug absorption or fluid sampling. These processing techniques incorporate one or more technologies that enable the precise machining, extrusion, casting, and/or forming of from one to an array or grid of microneedles. Evolving microneedle systems will be well positioned to address a significant segment of the large -molecule biological drugs expected to emerge from the convergence of automated discovery and genome mapping. To overcome the problems of oral route skin has been extensively studied as an alternative route of drug delivery. Skin is a large and easily accessible organ that can be readily used to administer drugs into the blood capillaries lying just tens of microns beneath the skin's surface. Despite the advantages offered by skin for drug delivery, clinical drug delivery through the skin is severely limited by the presence of the top most layers of dead cells called the stratum corneum. This layer is just 10-20 μm in depth, but is the rate-limiting barrier and only allows low molecular weight molecules with moderate oil and water solubility to diffuse through. This in turn restricts the drugs that can be delivered via the skin into a very narrow range. As a result, presently only thirteen active molecules are approved for delivery through the skin by the Food and Drug Administration.",
author = "P. Shivanand and P. Binal and D. Viral",
note = "Cited By :2 Export Date: 10 November 2017 Correspondence Address: Shivanand, P.; Smt. R. B. P. M. Pharmacy College, Atkot-360040, Rajkot, Gujarat, India; email: dot.shivanand@gmail.com Chemicals/CAS: collagen, 9007-34-5; insulin, 9004-10-8 References: Murphy, C.S., Prausnitz, M.R., Silicone hair spray compositions (1991), US Patent No. 4,983,377. International patents issued or pending in European Patent Office and 11 other countries; Murphy, C.S., Prausnitz, M.R., Silicone hair spray compositions (1991), US Patent No. 4,983,418. International patents issued or pending in European Patent Office and 11 other countries; Pliquett, U., Prausnitz, M.R., Weaver, J.C., Langer, R., Method for rapid temporal control of molecular transport across tissue (1996), US Patent No. 5,547,467; Pliquett, U., Prausnitz, M.R., Weaver, J.C., Langer, R., Method for rapid temporal control of molecular transport across tissue (1997), US Patent No. 5,667,491; Prausnitz, M.R., Allen, M.G., McAllister, D.V., Henry, S., Microneedle device for transport of molecules across tissue (2003), U.S. Patent No. 6,503,231; Prausnitz, M.R., Allen, M.G., Gujral, I.-J., Microneedle drug delivery device (2003), U.S. Patent No. 6,611,707; Park, J.-H., Prausnitz, M.R., Allen, M.G., Microfabrication of Metal and Polymer Drug Delivery Devices, , pending; Prausnitz, M.R., Allen, M.G., Gujral, I.-J., Microneedle Device for Extraction and Sensing of Bodily Fluids, , pending; Henry, S., McAllister, D.V., Prausnitz, M.R., Allen, M.G., Ackley, D.E., Jackson, T., Devices and methods for enhanced microneedle penetration of biological barriers U.S. Patent No. 6,743,211; Prausnitz, M.R., Lewis, T.N., Liu, J., Assessment and Control of Acoustic Tissue Effects, Pending; Wang, P.M., Prausnitz, M.R., Drilling Microneedles and Device for Drug Delivery and Body Fluid Extraction, , pending; Park, J.H., Yoon, K.Y., Prausnitz, M.R., Allen, M.G., Microfabricated Devices for Thermal Microporation of Tissue, , pending; Wang, P.M., Prausnitz, M.R., Martanto, W.S., Microinfusion Using Hollow Microneedles, , pending; McAllister, D.V., Allen, M.G., Prausnitz, M.R., Microfabricated microneedles for gene and drug delivery (2000) Annu. Rev. Biomed. Eng., 2, pp. 289-313; Trimmer, W., Ling, P., Chin, C.K., Orten, P., Gaugler, R., Hashmi, S., Hashmi, G., Reed, M., Injection of DNA into plant and animal tissues with micromechanical piercing structures (1995) Proceedings of the IEEE Microelectromechanical Systems Workshop 8th, Amsterdam, pp. 111-115; Hilt, J.Z., Peppas, N.A., Microfabricated drug delivery devices (2005) International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 306, pp. 15-23; Meidan, V.M., Michniak, B.B., Emerging Technologies in Transdermal Therapeutics (2004) American Journal of Therapeutics, 11 (4), pp. 312-316; Henry, S., McAllister, D.V., Allen, M.G., Prausnitz, M.R., Microfabricated Microneedles: A Novel Approach to Transdermal Drug Delivery (1998) Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 87, pp. 922-925",
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Microneedles: Progress in developing new technology for painless drug delivery. / Shivanand, P.; Binal, P.; Viral, D.

In: International Journal of PharmTech Research, Vol. 1, No. 4, 2009, p. 1279-1282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Microneedles: Progress in developing new technology for painless drug delivery

AU - Shivanand, P.

AU - Binal, P.

AU - Viral, D.

N1 - Cited By :2 Export Date: 10 November 2017 Correspondence Address: Shivanand, P.; Smt. R. B. P. M. Pharmacy College, Atkot-360040, Rajkot, Gujarat, India; email: dot.shivanand@gmail.com Chemicals/CAS: collagen, 9007-34-5; insulin, 9004-10-8 References: Murphy, C.S., Prausnitz, M.R., Silicone hair spray compositions (1991), US Patent No. 4,983,377. International patents issued or pending in European Patent Office and 11 other countries; Murphy, C.S., Prausnitz, M.R., Silicone hair spray compositions (1991), US Patent No. 4,983,418. International patents issued or pending in European Patent Office and 11 other countries; Pliquett, U., Prausnitz, M.R., Weaver, J.C., Langer, R., Method for rapid temporal control of molecular transport across tissue (1996), US Patent No. 5,547,467; Pliquett, U., Prausnitz, M.R., Weaver, J.C., Langer, R., Method for rapid temporal control of molecular transport across tissue (1997), US Patent No. 5,667,491; Prausnitz, M.R., Allen, M.G., McAllister, D.V., Henry, S., Microneedle device for transport of molecules across tissue (2003), U.S. Patent No. 6,503,231; Prausnitz, M.R., Allen, M.G., Gujral, I.-J., Microneedle drug delivery device (2003), U.S. Patent No. 6,611,707; Park, J.-H., Prausnitz, M.R., Allen, M.G., Microfabrication of Metal and Polymer Drug Delivery Devices, , pending; Prausnitz, M.R., Allen, M.G., Gujral, I.-J., Microneedle Device for Extraction and Sensing of Bodily Fluids, , pending; Henry, S., McAllister, D.V., Prausnitz, M.R., Allen, M.G., Ackley, D.E., Jackson, T., Devices and methods for enhanced microneedle penetration of biological barriers U.S. Patent No. 6,743,211; Prausnitz, M.R., Lewis, T.N., Liu, J., Assessment and Control of Acoustic Tissue Effects, Pending; Wang, P.M., Prausnitz, M.R., Drilling Microneedles and Device for Drug Delivery and Body Fluid Extraction, , pending; Park, J.H., Yoon, K.Y., Prausnitz, M.R., Allen, M.G., Microfabricated Devices for Thermal Microporation of Tissue, , pending; Wang, P.M., Prausnitz, M.R., Martanto, W.S., Microinfusion Using Hollow Microneedles, , pending; McAllister, D.V., Allen, M.G., Prausnitz, M.R., Microfabricated microneedles for gene and drug delivery (2000) Annu. Rev. Biomed. Eng., 2, pp. 289-313; Trimmer, W., Ling, P., Chin, C.K., Orten, P., Gaugler, R., Hashmi, S., Hashmi, G., Reed, M., Injection of DNA into plant and animal tissues with micromechanical piercing structures (1995) Proceedings of the IEEE Microelectromechanical Systems Workshop 8th, Amsterdam, pp. 111-115; Hilt, J.Z., Peppas, N.A., Microfabricated drug delivery devices (2005) International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 306, pp. 15-23; Meidan, V.M., Michniak, B.B., Emerging Technologies in Transdermal Therapeutics (2004) American Journal of Therapeutics, 11 (4), pp. 312-316; Henry, S., McAllister, D.V., Allen, M.G., Prausnitz, M.R., Microfabricated Microneedles: A Novel Approach to Transdermal Drug Delivery (1998) Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 87, pp. 922-925

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N2 - Advances in the processing of materials on a micro-scale have led to the development and introduction of devices that employ very small needles. That has significant potential in devices for diagnostics, healthcare monitoring and drug delivery by mechanically perforating the outer skin layer and allowing for transdermal drug absorption or fluid sampling. These processing techniques incorporate one or more technologies that enable the precise machining, extrusion, casting, and/or forming of from one to an array or grid of microneedles. Evolving microneedle systems will be well positioned to address a significant segment of the large -molecule biological drugs expected to emerge from the convergence of automated discovery and genome mapping. To overcome the problems of oral route skin has been extensively studied as an alternative route of drug delivery. Skin is a large and easily accessible organ that can be readily used to administer drugs into the blood capillaries lying just tens of microns beneath the skin's surface. Despite the advantages offered by skin for drug delivery, clinical drug delivery through the skin is severely limited by the presence of the top most layers of dead cells called the stratum corneum. This layer is just 10-20 μm in depth, but is the rate-limiting barrier and only allows low molecular weight molecules with moderate oil and water solubility to diffuse through. This in turn restricts the drugs that can be delivered via the skin into a very narrow range. As a result, presently only thirteen active molecules are approved for delivery through the skin by the Food and Drug Administration.

AB - Advances in the processing of materials on a micro-scale have led to the development and introduction of devices that employ very small needles. That has significant potential in devices for diagnostics, healthcare monitoring and drug delivery by mechanically perforating the outer skin layer and allowing for transdermal drug absorption or fluid sampling. These processing techniques incorporate one or more technologies that enable the precise machining, extrusion, casting, and/or forming of from one to an array or grid of microneedles. Evolving microneedle systems will be well positioned to address a significant segment of the large -molecule biological drugs expected to emerge from the convergence of automated discovery and genome mapping. To overcome the problems of oral route skin has been extensively studied as an alternative route of drug delivery. Skin is a large and easily accessible organ that can be readily used to administer drugs into the blood capillaries lying just tens of microns beneath the skin's surface. Despite the advantages offered by skin for drug delivery, clinical drug delivery through the skin is severely limited by the presence of the top most layers of dead cells called the stratum corneum. This layer is just 10-20 μm in depth, but is the rate-limiting barrier and only allows low molecular weight molecules with moderate oil and water solubility to diffuse through. This in turn restricts the drugs that can be delivered via the skin into a very narrow range. As a result, presently only thirteen active molecules are approved for delivery through the skin by the Food and Drug Administration.

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JO - International Journal of PharmTech Research

JF - International Journal of PharmTech Research

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