Molecular events in melanoma development and progression.

F. Meier, K. Satyamoorthy, M. Nesbit, M. Y. Hsu, B. Schittek, C. Garbe, M. Herlyn

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    109 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Based on clinical and histopathological features, five steps of melanoma progression have been proposed: common acquired and congenital nevi with structurally normal melanocytes, dysplastic nevus with structural and architectural atypia, early radial growth phase (RGP) primary melanoma, advanced vertical growth phase primary melanoma (VGP) with competence for metastasis, and metastatic melanoma. Despite a wealth of research resources (tissues, cell lines, and antibodies), the genetic alterations responsible for the development and stepwise progression of melanoma are still unclear. Cytogenetic analyses have failed to identify consistent gene deletions, mutations, translocations, or amplifications in sporadic cases. However, in vitro characterization of melanoma cells has revealed fundamental differences from normal melanocytes. Earlier work using monoclonal antibodies has defined a variety of melanoma-associated antigens that mediate cell-cell or cell-substratum adhesion, growth regulation, proteolysis, and modulation of immune responses. Functional studies of these individual candidate molecules will lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of melanoma and of potential targets for rational therapy.

    Original languageEnglish
    JournalFrontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library
    Volume3
    Publication statusPublished - 1998

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    Melanoma
    Proteolysis
    Cell adhesion
    Melanocytes
    Amplification
    Genes
    Monoclonal Antibodies
    Cells
    Modulation
    Tissue
    Growth
    Antigens
    Dysplastic Nevus Syndrome
    Molecules
    Melanoma-Specific Antigens
    Antibodies
    Sequence Deletion
    Nevus
    Cytogenetic Analysis
    Gene Deletion

    Cite this

    Meier, F., Satyamoorthy, K., Nesbit, M., Hsu, M. Y., Schittek, B., Garbe, C., & Herlyn, M. (1998). Molecular events in melanoma development and progression. Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library, 3.
    Meier, F. ; Satyamoorthy, K. ; Nesbit, M. ; Hsu, M. Y. ; Schittek, B. ; Garbe, C. ; Herlyn, M. / Molecular events in melanoma development and progression. In: Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library. 1998 ; Vol. 3.
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    Molecular events in melanoma development and progression. / Meier, F.; Satyamoorthy, K.; Nesbit, M.; Hsu, M. Y.; Schittek, B.; Garbe, C.; Herlyn, M.

    In: Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library, Vol. 3, 1998.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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    T1 - Molecular events in melanoma development and progression.

    AU - Meier, F.

    AU - Satyamoorthy, K.

    AU - Nesbit, M.

    AU - Hsu, M. Y.

    AU - Schittek, B.

    AU - Garbe, C.

    AU - Herlyn, M.

    PY - 1998

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    N2 - Based on clinical and histopathological features, five steps of melanoma progression have been proposed: common acquired and congenital nevi with structurally normal melanocytes, dysplastic nevus with structural and architectural atypia, early radial growth phase (RGP) primary melanoma, advanced vertical growth phase primary melanoma (VGP) with competence for metastasis, and metastatic melanoma. Despite a wealth of research resources (tissues, cell lines, and antibodies), the genetic alterations responsible for the development and stepwise progression of melanoma are still unclear. Cytogenetic analyses have failed to identify consistent gene deletions, mutations, translocations, or amplifications in sporadic cases. However, in vitro characterization of melanoma cells has revealed fundamental differences from normal melanocytes. Earlier work using monoclonal antibodies has defined a variety of melanoma-associated antigens that mediate cell-cell or cell-substratum adhesion, growth regulation, proteolysis, and modulation of immune responses. Functional studies of these individual candidate molecules will lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of melanoma and of potential targets for rational therapy.

    AB - Based on clinical and histopathological features, five steps of melanoma progression have been proposed: common acquired and congenital nevi with structurally normal melanocytes, dysplastic nevus with structural and architectural atypia, early radial growth phase (RGP) primary melanoma, advanced vertical growth phase primary melanoma (VGP) with competence for metastasis, and metastatic melanoma. Despite a wealth of research resources (tissues, cell lines, and antibodies), the genetic alterations responsible for the development and stepwise progression of melanoma are still unclear. Cytogenetic analyses have failed to identify consistent gene deletions, mutations, translocations, or amplifications in sporadic cases. However, in vitro characterization of melanoma cells has revealed fundamental differences from normal melanocytes. Earlier work using monoclonal antibodies has defined a variety of melanoma-associated antigens that mediate cell-cell or cell-substratum adhesion, growth regulation, proteolysis, and modulation of immune responses. Functional studies of these individual candidate molecules will lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of melanoma and of potential targets for rational therapy.

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