Moving stroke rehabilitation research evidence into clinical practice: Consensus-based core recommendations from the Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Roundtable

Janice J. Eng, Marie Louise Bird, Erin Godecke, Tammy C. Hoffmann, Carole Laurin, Olumide A. Olaoye, John Solomon, Robert Teasell, Caroline L. Watkins, Marion F. Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Moving research evidence to practice can take years, if not decades, which denies stroke patients and families from receiving the best care. We present the results of an international consensus process prioritizing what research evidence to implement into stroke rehabilitation practice to have maximal impact. An international 10-member Knowledge Translation Working Group collaborated over a six-month period via videoconferences and a two-day face-to-face meeting. The process was informed from surveys received from 112 consumers/family members and 502 health care providers in over 28 countries, as well as from an international advisory of 20 representatives from 13 countries. From this consensus process, five of the nine identified priorities relate to service delivery (interdisciplinary care, screening and assessment, clinical practice guidelines, intensity, family support) and are generally feasible to implement or improve upon today. Readily available website resources are identified to help health care providers harness the necessary means to implement existing knowledge and solutions to improve service delivery. The remaining four priorities relate to system issues (access to services, transitions in care) and resources (equipment/technology, staffing) and are acknowledged to be more difficult to implement. We recommend that health care providers, managers, and organizations determine whether the priorities we identified are gaps in their local practice, and if so, consider implementation solutions to address them to improve the quality of lives of people living with stroke.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)766-773
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Stroke
Volume14
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-10-2019

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Health Personnel
Consensus
Stroke
Videoconferencing
Translational Medical Research
Practice Guidelines
Research
Organizations
Technology
Equipment and Supplies
Rehabilitation Research
Stroke Rehabilitation
Transitional Care
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology

Cite this

Eng, Janice J. ; Bird, Marie Louise ; Godecke, Erin ; Hoffmann, Tammy C. ; Laurin, Carole ; Olaoye, Olumide A. ; Solomon, John ; Teasell, Robert ; Watkins, Caroline L. ; Walker, Marion F. / Moving stroke rehabilitation research evidence into clinical practice : Consensus-based core recommendations from the Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Roundtable. In: International Journal of Stroke. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 8. pp. 766-773.
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Moving stroke rehabilitation research evidence into clinical practice : Consensus-based core recommendations from the Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Roundtable. / Eng, Janice J.; Bird, Marie Louise; Godecke, Erin; Hoffmann, Tammy C.; Laurin, Carole; Olaoye, Olumide A.; Solomon, John; Teasell, Robert; Watkins, Caroline L.; Walker, Marion F.

In: International Journal of Stroke, Vol. 14, No. 8, 01.10.2019, p. 766-773.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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