Neonatal sepsis due to glycopeptide resistant Enterococcus faecium from colonized maternal gut- rare case evidence

Supram Hosuru Subramanya, Rajesh Amberpet, Dinesh Chaudhary, Niranjan Nayak, Shashiraja Padukone, Indira Bairy, Shishir Gokhale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Vancomycin-resistant enterococcal infections in the neonatal ICU are growing global problems. We report a case of neonatal septicemia by multidrug-resistant vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE), the source of infection being the mother's gut. Case presentation: A newborn male child admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was diagnosed to have mild meconium aspiration syndrome, early onset neonatal septicemia, and bacteremia by multidrug and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Screening of gut flora of the baby and the mother were carried out to trace the source of infection. Stool cultures of the mother and the baby yielded Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium. All three isolates of Enterococcus faecium had similar antibiogram, harbored the vanA gene and similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. Baby responded to the 1 week therapy with oral linezolid suspension 20 mg/kg/day, 1 ml/t.d.s. No VRE was isolated from baby on a repeat stool culture 1 week after the linezolid therapy. He was discharged with the advice for the continuance of linezolid for seven more days. Conclusion: Isolation of MDR-VRE from the blood culture of the baby and stool specimens of the mother and the baby with the same antibiogram profile and clonal similarities reveals that maternal gut colonization was responsible for neonatal sepsis. Optimal infection control measures and the development of guidelines for monitoring VRE colonization in pregnant women might be useful in reducing the occurrence of neonatal sepsis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number29
JournalAntimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 08-02-2019

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Enterococcus faecium
Glycopeptides
Linezolid
Mothers
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Sepsis
Infection
Meconium Aspiration Syndrome
Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis
Vancomycin
Infection Control
Bacteremia
Neonatal Sepsis
Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci
Pregnant Women
Suspensions
Newborn Infant
Guidelines
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Subramanya, Supram Hosuru ; Amberpet, Rajesh ; Chaudhary, Dinesh ; Nayak, Niranjan ; Padukone, Shashiraja ; Bairy, Indira ; Gokhale, Shishir. / Neonatal sepsis due to glycopeptide resistant Enterococcus faecium from colonized maternal gut- rare case evidence. In: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control. 2019 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
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Neonatal sepsis due to glycopeptide resistant Enterococcus faecium from colonized maternal gut- rare case evidence. / Subramanya, Supram Hosuru; Amberpet, Rajesh; Chaudhary, Dinesh; Nayak, Niranjan; Padukone, Shashiraja; Bairy, Indira; Gokhale, Shishir.

In: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, Vol. 8, No. 1, 29, 08.02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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