Nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli other than pseudomonas aeruginosa and acinetobacter spp. causing respiratory tract infections in a tertiary care center

Kisumu Chawla, Shashidhar Vishwanath, Frenil C. Munim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli have emerged as important healthcare-associated pathogens. It is important to correctly identify all clinically significant nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli considering the intrinsic multidrug resistance exhibited by these bacteria. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was undertaken to identify the various nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli other than Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. isolated from respiratory samples (n = 9363), to understand their clinical relevance and to analyze their antibiotic susceptibility pattern. Results: Nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli were isolated from 830 (16.4%) samples showing significant growth. Thirty-three (4%) isolates constituted nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli other than P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (15, 45.5%) was the most common isolate followed by Burkholderia cepacia (4, 12.1%), Sphingomonas paucimobilis (3, 9.1%), and Achromobacter xylosoxidans (3, 9.1%). On the basis of clinicomicrobiological correlation, pathogenicity was observed in 69.7% (n = 23) isolates. Timely and correct treatment resulted in clinical improvement in 87.9% cases. Conclusion: Any nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli isolated from respiratory tract infection should not be ignored as mere contaminant, but correlated clinically for its pathogenic potential and identified using standard methods so as to institute appropriate and timely antibiotic coverage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)144-148
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Global Infectious Diseases
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-10-2013

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Acinetobacter
Tertiary Care Centers
Respiratory Tract Infections
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Bacillus
Achromobacter denitrificans
Sphingomonas
Stenotrophomonas maltophilia
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Burkholderia cepacia
Multiple Drug Resistance
Virulence
Retrospective Studies
Bacteria
Delivery of Health Care
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli have emerged as important healthcare-associated pathogens. It is important to correctly identify all clinically significant nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli considering the intrinsic multidrug resistance exhibited by these bacteria. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was undertaken to identify the various nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli other than Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. isolated from respiratory samples (n = 9363), to understand their clinical relevance and to analyze their antibiotic susceptibility pattern. Results: Nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli were isolated from 830 (16.4{\%}) samples showing significant growth. Thirty-three (4{\%}) isolates constituted nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli other than P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (15, 45.5{\%}) was the most common isolate followed by Burkholderia cepacia (4, 12.1{\%}), Sphingomonas paucimobilis (3, 9.1{\%}), and Achromobacter xylosoxidans (3, 9.1{\%}). On the basis of clinicomicrobiological correlation, pathogenicity was observed in 69.7{\%} (n = 23) isolates. Timely and correct treatment resulted in clinical improvement in 87.9{\%} cases. Conclusion: Any nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli isolated from respiratory tract infection should not be ignored as mere contaminant, but correlated clinically for its pathogenic potential and identified using standard methods so as to institute appropriate and timely antibiotic coverage.",
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Nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli other than pseudomonas aeruginosa and acinetobacter spp. causing respiratory tract infections in a tertiary care center. / Chawla, Kisumu; Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Munim, Frenil C.

In: Journal of Global Infectious Diseases, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.10.2013, p. 144-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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