Oral antidiabetic activities of different extracts of Caesalpinia bonducella seed kernels

S. Parameshwar, K.K. Srinivasan, C.M. Rao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Caesalpinia bonducella F. (Leguminosae) is a medicinal plant, widely distributed throughout India and the tropical regions of the world. Its seed kernels are used in the management of diabetes mellitus, in the folklore medicine of Andaman and Nicobar as well as the Caribbean Islands. The seed kernel powder was reported to have hypoglycaemic activity in experimental animals. Four extracts (petroleum ether, ether, ethyl acetate and aqueous) of the seed kernels were prepared and tested for their hypoglycaemic potentials in normal as well as alloxan induced diabetic rats. In normal rats, only ethyl acetate and aqueous extracts showed a minimum significant hypoglycaemic effect, compared to that of glibenclamide. In diabetic rats, both the polar extracts (ethyl acetate and aqueous) as well as glibenclamide, showed significant hypoglycaemic effect, besides, reversing the diabetes induced changes in lipid and liver glycogen levels. As far as the non-polar extracts were concerned, the ether extract showed a marginal antidiabetic activity, while the petroleum ether extract failed to show any. Since both the polar extracts were, chemically, found to contain triterpenoidal glycosides, we presume that they might be the active principles contributing to the antidiabetic actions. In in vitro antioxidant studies, the aqueous extract was found to be devoid of any free radical scavenging activity, while the ethyl acetate extract showed a maximum of 49% activity at the end of 1 h. Although the antioxidant potential of ethyl acetate extract may contribute to overcome the diabetes linked oxidative stress, it needs not necessarily contribute to its hypoglycaemic activity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)590-595
Number of pages6
JournalPharmaceutical Biology
Volume40
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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Caesalpinia
Hypoglycemic Agents
Seeds
Glyburide
Ether
Antioxidants
Folklore
West Indies
Liver Glycogen
Alloxan
Medicinal Plants
Glycosides
Fabaceae
Powders
Free Radicals
India
Diabetes Mellitus
Oxidative Stress
Medicine
ethyl acetate

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@article{6e63b1ad025e40ce8b224c275c7e63d2,
title = "Oral antidiabetic activities of different extracts of Caesalpinia bonducella seed kernels",
abstract = "Caesalpinia bonducella F. (Leguminosae) is a medicinal plant, widely distributed throughout India and the tropical regions of the world. Its seed kernels are used in the management of diabetes mellitus, in the folklore medicine of Andaman and Nicobar as well as the Caribbean Islands. The seed kernel powder was reported to have hypoglycaemic activity in experimental animals. Four extracts (petroleum ether, ether, ethyl acetate and aqueous) of the seed kernels were prepared and tested for their hypoglycaemic potentials in normal as well as alloxan induced diabetic rats. In normal rats, only ethyl acetate and aqueous extracts showed a minimum significant hypoglycaemic effect, compared to that of glibenclamide. In diabetic rats, both the polar extracts (ethyl acetate and aqueous) as well as glibenclamide, showed significant hypoglycaemic effect, besides, reversing the diabetes induced changes in lipid and liver glycogen levels. As far as the non-polar extracts were concerned, the ether extract showed a marginal antidiabetic activity, while the petroleum ether extract failed to show any. Since both the polar extracts were, chemically, found to contain triterpenoidal glycosides, we presume that they might be the active principles contributing to the antidiabetic actions. In in vitro antioxidant studies, the aqueous extract was found to be devoid of any free radical scavenging activity, while the ethyl acetate extract showed a maximum of 49{\%} activity at the end of 1 h. Although the antioxidant potential of ethyl acetate extract may contribute to overcome the diabetes linked oxidative stress, it needs not necessarily contribute to its hypoglycaemic activity.",
author = "S. Parameshwar and K.K. Srinivasan and C.M. Rao",
note = "Cited By :11 Export Date: 10 November 2017 CODEN: PHBIF Correspondence Address: Rao, C.M.; Department of Pharmacology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal-576119, India; email: cmallikin@yahoo.co.in Chemicals/CAS: acetic acid ethyl ester, 141-78-6; alcohol, 64-17-5; ether, 60-29-7; glibenclamide, 10238-21-8; petroleum ether, 8032-32-4 Tradenames: daonil, Hoechst, India Manufacturers: Hoechst, India References: Baynes, J.W., Role of oxidative stress in development of complications in diabetes (1991) Diabetes, 40, pp. 405-412; Biswas, T.K., Bandyopadhyay, S., Biswapati, M., Bhaswar, M., Sengupta, B.R., Oral hypoglycaemic effect of Caesalpinia bonducella (1997) Int J Pharmacog, 35, pp. 261-264; Chattopadhyay, S., Ramanathan, M., Das, J., Bhattacharya, S.K., Animal models in experimental diabetes mellitus (1997) Ind J Exptl Biol, 35, pp. 1141-1145; Dhar, M.L., Dhar, M.M., Dhawan, B.N., Mehrotra, B.N., Roy, C., Screening of Indian plants for biological activity (1968) Ind J Exptl Biol, 6, pp. 232-247; Ghosh, M.N., Toxicity studies (1984) Fundamentals of Experimental Pharmacology, pp. 153-158. , Ghosh MN, ed. Calcutta, Scientific Book Agenc; Hideaki, K., Kajimoto, Y., Miyagawa, J., Matsuoka, T., Fujitani, Y., Umayahara, Y., Hanafusa, T., Yamasaki, Y., Beneficial effects of antioxidants in diabetes (1999) Diabetes, 48, pp. 2398-2401; Ivorra, M.D., Paya, M., Villar, A., A review of natural products and plants as potential antidiabetic drugs (1989) J Ethnopharmacol, 27, pp. 243-275; Iyengar, M.A., Pendse, G.S., Anti-diarrhoeal activity of the nut of Caesalpinia bonducella. Flem (1965) Ind J Pharm, 27, pp. 307-308; Kato, K., Terao, S., Shimamoto, N., Hirata, M., Studies on scavengers of active oxygen species, synthesis and biological activity of 2-O-alkyl ascorbic acid (1988) J Med Chem, 31, pp. 793-798; Larkins, R.G., Dunlop, M.E., The link between hyperglycaemia and diabetic nephropathy (1992) Diabetologia, 35, pp. 499-504; Neogi, N.C., Nayak, K.P., Biological investigation of Caesalpinia bonducella Flem (1958) Ind J Pharm, 20, pp. 95-100; Nicholas, V., The determination of glycogen in liver and muscle by use of anthrone reagent (1956) Ind J Biol Chem, 220, p. 583; Paget, G.E., Burnes, J.M., Toxicity tests (1964) Evaluation of Drug Activities, , Lawrence DR, Bucharach AL, eds. New York, Academic Press, 148 pp; Peter, S., Tinto, W.F., McLean, S., Reynolds, W.F., Yu, M., Cassane diterpenes from Caesalpinia bonducella (1998) Phytochemistry, 47, pp. 1153-1155; Raghunathan, K., Mitra, R., Caesalpinia bonducella (1982) Pharmacognosy of Indigenous Drugs, pp. 484-487. , Raghunathan K, Mitra R, eds., New Delhi, Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Siddha; Rao, V.V., Dwivedi, S.K., Swarup, D., Hypoglycaemic effect of Caesalpinia bonducella in rabbits (1994) Fitoterapia, 65, pp. 245-247; Sato, Y., Hotta, N., Sakamoto, N., Matsuoka, S., Lipid peroxide level in plasma of diabetic patients (1979) Biochem Med, 21, pp. 104-107; Sharma, S.R., Dwivedi, S.K., Swarup, D., Hypoglycaemic, antihyperglycaemic and hypolipidemic activities of Caesalpinia bonducella seeds in rats (1997) J Ethnopharmacol, 58, pp. 39-44",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1076/phbi.40.8.590.14656",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "590--595",
journal = "Pharmaceutical Biology",
issn = "1388-0209",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
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}

Oral antidiabetic activities of different extracts of Caesalpinia bonducella seed kernels. / Parameshwar, S.; Srinivasan, K.K.; Rao, C.M.

In: Pharmaceutical Biology, Vol. 40, No. 8, 2002, p. 590-595.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oral antidiabetic activities of different extracts of Caesalpinia bonducella seed kernels

AU - Parameshwar, S.

AU - Srinivasan, K.K.

AU - Rao, C.M.

N1 - Cited By :11 Export Date: 10 November 2017 CODEN: PHBIF Correspondence Address: Rao, C.M.; Department of Pharmacology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal-576119, India; email: cmallikin@yahoo.co.in Chemicals/CAS: acetic acid ethyl ester, 141-78-6; alcohol, 64-17-5; ether, 60-29-7; glibenclamide, 10238-21-8; petroleum ether, 8032-32-4 Tradenames: daonil, Hoechst, India Manufacturers: Hoechst, India References: Baynes, J.W., Role of oxidative stress in development of complications in diabetes (1991) Diabetes, 40, pp. 405-412; Biswas, T.K., Bandyopadhyay, S., Biswapati, M., Bhaswar, M., Sengupta, B.R., Oral hypoglycaemic effect of Caesalpinia bonducella (1997) Int J Pharmacog, 35, pp. 261-264; Chattopadhyay, S., Ramanathan, M., Das, J., Bhattacharya, S.K., Animal models in experimental diabetes mellitus (1997) Ind J Exptl Biol, 35, pp. 1141-1145; Dhar, M.L., Dhar, M.M., Dhawan, B.N., Mehrotra, B.N., Roy, C., Screening of Indian plants for biological activity (1968) Ind J Exptl Biol, 6, pp. 232-247; Ghosh, M.N., Toxicity studies (1984) Fundamentals of Experimental Pharmacology, pp. 153-158. , Ghosh MN, ed. Calcutta, Scientific Book Agenc; Hideaki, K., Kajimoto, Y., Miyagawa, J., Matsuoka, T., Fujitani, Y., Umayahara, Y., Hanafusa, T., Yamasaki, Y., Beneficial effects of antioxidants in diabetes (1999) Diabetes, 48, pp. 2398-2401; Ivorra, M.D., Paya, M., Villar, A., A review of natural products and plants as potential antidiabetic drugs (1989) J Ethnopharmacol, 27, pp. 243-275; Iyengar, M.A., Pendse, G.S., Anti-diarrhoeal activity of the nut of Caesalpinia bonducella. Flem (1965) Ind J Pharm, 27, pp. 307-308; Kato, K., Terao, S., Shimamoto, N., Hirata, M., Studies on scavengers of active oxygen species, synthesis and biological activity of 2-O-alkyl ascorbic acid (1988) J Med Chem, 31, pp. 793-798; Larkins, R.G., Dunlop, M.E., The link between hyperglycaemia and diabetic nephropathy (1992) Diabetologia, 35, pp. 499-504; Neogi, N.C., Nayak, K.P., Biological investigation of Caesalpinia bonducella Flem (1958) Ind J Pharm, 20, pp. 95-100; Nicholas, V., The determination of glycogen in liver and muscle by use of anthrone reagent (1956) Ind J Biol Chem, 220, p. 583; Paget, G.E., Burnes, J.M., Toxicity tests (1964) Evaluation of Drug Activities, , Lawrence DR, Bucharach AL, eds. New York, Academic Press, 148 pp; Peter, S., Tinto, W.F., McLean, S., Reynolds, W.F., Yu, M., Cassane diterpenes from Caesalpinia bonducella (1998) Phytochemistry, 47, pp. 1153-1155; Raghunathan, K., Mitra, R., Caesalpinia bonducella (1982) Pharmacognosy of Indigenous Drugs, pp. 484-487. , Raghunathan K, Mitra R, eds., New Delhi, Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Siddha; Rao, V.V., Dwivedi, S.K., Swarup, D., Hypoglycaemic effect of Caesalpinia bonducella in rabbits (1994) Fitoterapia, 65, pp. 245-247; Sato, Y., Hotta, N., Sakamoto, N., Matsuoka, S., Lipid peroxide level in plasma of diabetic patients (1979) Biochem Med, 21, pp. 104-107; Sharma, S.R., Dwivedi, S.K., Swarup, D., Hypoglycaemic, antihyperglycaemic and hypolipidemic activities of Caesalpinia bonducella seeds in rats (1997) J Ethnopharmacol, 58, pp. 39-44

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Caesalpinia bonducella F. (Leguminosae) is a medicinal plant, widely distributed throughout India and the tropical regions of the world. Its seed kernels are used in the management of diabetes mellitus, in the folklore medicine of Andaman and Nicobar as well as the Caribbean Islands. The seed kernel powder was reported to have hypoglycaemic activity in experimental animals. Four extracts (petroleum ether, ether, ethyl acetate and aqueous) of the seed kernels were prepared and tested for their hypoglycaemic potentials in normal as well as alloxan induced diabetic rats. In normal rats, only ethyl acetate and aqueous extracts showed a minimum significant hypoglycaemic effect, compared to that of glibenclamide. In diabetic rats, both the polar extracts (ethyl acetate and aqueous) as well as glibenclamide, showed significant hypoglycaemic effect, besides, reversing the diabetes induced changes in lipid and liver glycogen levels. As far as the non-polar extracts were concerned, the ether extract showed a marginal antidiabetic activity, while the petroleum ether extract failed to show any. Since both the polar extracts were, chemically, found to contain triterpenoidal glycosides, we presume that they might be the active principles contributing to the antidiabetic actions. In in vitro antioxidant studies, the aqueous extract was found to be devoid of any free radical scavenging activity, while the ethyl acetate extract showed a maximum of 49% activity at the end of 1 h. Although the antioxidant potential of ethyl acetate extract may contribute to overcome the diabetes linked oxidative stress, it needs not necessarily contribute to its hypoglycaemic activity.

AB - Caesalpinia bonducella F. (Leguminosae) is a medicinal plant, widely distributed throughout India and the tropical regions of the world. Its seed kernels are used in the management of diabetes mellitus, in the folklore medicine of Andaman and Nicobar as well as the Caribbean Islands. The seed kernel powder was reported to have hypoglycaemic activity in experimental animals. Four extracts (petroleum ether, ether, ethyl acetate and aqueous) of the seed kernels were prepared and tested for their hypoglycaemic potentials in normal as well as alloxan induced diabetic rats. In normal rats, only ethyl acetate and aqueous extracts showed a minimum significant hypoglycaemic effect, compared to that of glibenclamide. In diabetic rats, both the polar extracts (ethyl acetate and aqueous) as well as glibenclamide, showed significant hypoglycaemic effect, besides, reversing the diabetes induced changes in lipid and liver glycogen levels. As far as the non-polar extracts were concerned, the ether extract showed a marginal antidiabetic activity, while the petroleum ether extract failed to show any. Since both the polar extracts were, chemically, found to contain triterpenoidal glycosides, we presume that they might be the active principles contributing to the antidiabetic actions. In in vitro antioxidant studies, the aqueous extract was found to be devoid of any free radical scavenging activity, while the ethyl acetate extract showed a maximum of 49% activity at the end of 1 h. Although the antioxidant potential of ethyl acetate extract may contribute to overcome the diabetes linked oxidative stress, it needs not necessarily contribute to its hypoglycaemic activity.

U2 - 10.1076/phbi.40.8.590.14656

DO - 10.1076/phbi.40.8.590.14656

M3 - Article

VL - 40

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EP - 595

JO - Pharmaceutical Biology

JF - Pharmaceutical Biology

SN - 1388-0209

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