Partner Counselling and Referral Services (PCRS) for HIV in armed forces - Visiting a blind spot

S. Shankar, R. S. Chatterji, N. Ray Chaudary, L. R. Sharma, S. P. Gorthi, K. Shanmuganandan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Indian armed forces have over 5000 cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection since 1990. The spouses of the affected soldiers are at a constant risk of contracting infection if not informed of their husband's HIV status. The onus of counselling the spouse has been delegated to the commanding officer (CO) of the soldier as per policy. The spouses usually reside at their hometown away from the soldier's unit and bridging this "geographical discordance" and offering effective counselling becomes a tricky issue for the commanding officer (CO). This article examines the effectiveness of this strategy as practised in Indian armed forces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)367-369
Number of pages3
JournalMedical Journal Armed Forces India
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2006

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Optic Disk
Spouses
Counseling
Military Personnel
Referral and Consultation
HIV
Virus Diseases
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Shankar, S. ; Chatterji, R. S. ; Chaudary, N. Ray ; Sharma, L. R. ; Gorthi, S. P. ; Shanmuganandan, K. / Partner Counselling and Referral Services (PCRS) for HIV in armed forces - Visiting a blind spot. In: Medical Journal Armed Forces India. 2006 ; Vol. 62, No. 4. pp. 367-369.
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Partner Counselling and Referral Services (PCRS) for HIV in armed forces - Visiting a blind spot. / Shankar, S.; Chatterji, R. S.; Chaudary, N. Ray; Sharma, L. R.; Gorthi, S. P.; Shanmuganandan, K.

In: Medical Journal Armed Forces India, Vol. 62, No. 4, 01.01.2006, p. 367-369.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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