Perceived stress, sources and severity of stress among medical undergraduates in a Pakistani medical school

Mohsin Shah, Shahid Hasan, Samina Malik, Chandrashekhar T. Sreeramareddy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Recently there is a growing concern about stress during undergraduate medical training. However, studies about the same are lacking from Pakistani medical schools. The objectives of our study were to assess perceived stress, sources of stress and their severity and to assess the determinants of stressed cases. Methods. A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was carried out among undergraduate medical students of CMH Lahore Medical College, Pakistan during January to March 2009. Perceived stress was assessed using the perceived stress scale. A 33-item questionnaire was used to assess sources of stress and their severity. Results. The overall response rate was 80.5% (161 out of 200 students). The overall mean perceived stress was 30.84 (SD = 7.01) and was significantly higher among female students. By logistic regression analysis, stressed cases were associated with occurrence of psychosocial (OR 5.01, 95% CI 2.44-10.29) and academic related stressors (OR 3.17 95% CI 1.52-6.68). The most common sources of stress were related to academic and psychosocial concerns. 'High parental expectations', 'frequency of examinations', 'vastness of academic curriculum', 'sleeping difficulties', 'worrying about the future', 'loneliness', 'becoming a doctor', 'performance in periodic examinations' were the most frequently and severely occurring sources of stress. There was a negative but insignificant correlation between perceived stress and academic performance (r = -0.099, p > 0.05). Conclusion. A higher level of perceived stress was reported by the students. The main stressors were related to academic and psychosocial domains. Further studies are required to test the association between stressed cases and gender, academic stressors and psychosocial stressors.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2
JournalBMC Medical Education
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23-02-2010
Externally publishedYes

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school
examination
questionnaire
female student
Pakistan
performance
medical student
regression analysis
student
logistics
determinants
curriculum
gender

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

Shah, Mohsin ; Hasan, Shahid ; Malik, Samina ; Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T. / Perceived stress, sources and severity of stress among medical undergraduates in a Pakistani medical school. In: BMC Medical Education. 2010 ; Vol. 10, No. 1.
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Perceived stress, sources and severity of stress among medical undergraduates in a Pakistani medical school. / Shah, Mohsin; Hasan, Shahid; Malik, Samina; Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T.

In: BMC Medical Education, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2, 23.02.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Background. Recently there is a growing concern about stress during undergraduate medical training. However, studies about the same are lacking from Pakistani medical schools. The objectives of our study were to assess perceived stress, sources of stress and their severity and to assess the determinants of stressed cases. Methods. A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was carried out among undergraduate medical students of CMH Lahore Medical College, Pakistan during January to March 2009. Perceived stress was assessed using the perceived stress scale. A 33-item questionnaire was used to assess sources of stress and their severity. Results. The overall response rate was 80.5% (161 out of 200 students). The overall mean perceived stress was 30.84 (SD = 7.01) and was significantly higher among female students. By logistic regression analysis, stressed cases were associated with occurrence of psychosocial (OR 5.01, 95% CI 2.44-10.29) and academic related stressors (OR 3.17 95% CI 1.52-6.68). The most common sources of stress were related to academic and psychosocial concerns. 'High parental expectations', 'frequency of examinations', 'vastness of academic curriculum', 'sleeping difficulties', 'worrying about the future', 'loneliness', 'becoming a doctor', 'performance in periodic examinations' were the most frequently and severely occurring sources of stress. There was a negative but insignificant correlation between perceived stress and academic performance (r = -0.099, p > 0.05). Conclusion. A higher level of perceived stress was reported by the students. The main stressors were related to academic and psychosocial domains. Further studies are required to test the association between stressed cases and gender, academic stressors and psychosocial stressors.

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