Perceptions and Practices of Self-Medication among Medical Students in Coastal South India

Nithin Kumar, Tanuj Kanchan, Bhaskaran Unnikrishnan, T. Rekha, Prasanna Mithra, Vaman Kulkarni, Mohan Kumar Papanna, Ramesh Holla, Surabhi Uppal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-medication is a common practice worldwide and the irrational use of drugs is a cause of concern. This study assessed the prevalence of self-medication among the medical students in South India. The data was analysed using SPSS version 11.5. A total of 440 students were included in the study. The prevalence of self-medication was 78.6%. A larger number of females were self-medicating (81.2%) than males (75.3%). The majority of the students self-medicated because of the illness being too trivial for consultation (70.5%). Antipyretics were most commonly self-medicated by the participants (74.8%). Only 47% of the participants opined that self-medication was a part of self-care and it needs to be encouraged. 39.3% of the participants perceived that the supply of medicine without prescription by the pharmacist can prevent the growing trend of self-medication. Easy availability and accessibility to health care facilities remains the cornerstone for reducing the practice of self-medication.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere72247
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28-08-2013

Fingerprint

Self Medication
Medical Students
drug therapy
India
students
Students
Antipyretics
Health care
Medicine
Availability
antipyretics
Health Facilities
Self Care
Pharmacists
Pharmaceutical Preparations
health services
Prescriptions
medicine
Referral and Consultation
Cross-Sectional Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

@article{700af77539394041ac220c577ae4465e,
title = "Perceptions and Practices of Self-Medication among Medical Students in Coastal South India",
abstract = "Self-medication is a common practice worldwide and the irrational use of drugs is a cause of concern. This study assessed the prevalence of self-medication among the medical students in South India. The data was analysed using SPSS version 11.5. A total of 440 students were included in the study. The prevalence of self-medication was 78.6{\%}. A larger number of females were self-medicating (81.2{\%}) than males (75.3{\%}). The majority of the students self-medicated because of the illness being too trivial for consultation (70.5{\%}). Antipyretics were most commonly self-medicated by the participants (74.8{\%}). Only 47{\%} of the participants opined that self-medication was a part of self-care and it needs to be encouraged. 39.3{\%} of the participants perceived that the supply of medicine without prescription by the pharmacist can prevent the growing trend of self-medication. Easy availability and accessibility to health care facilities remains the cornerstone for reducing the practice of self-medication.",
author = "Nithin Kumar and Tanuj Kanchan and Bhaskaran Unnikrishnan and T. Rekha and Prasanna Mithra and Vaman Kulkarni and Papanna, {Mohan Kumar} and Ramesh Holla and Surabhi Uppal",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0072247",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "8",

}

Perceptions and Practices of Self-Medication among Medical Students in Coastal South India. / Kumar, Nithin; Kanchan, Tanuj; Unnikrishnan, Bhaskaran; Rekha, T.; Mithra, Prasanna; Kulkarni, Vaman; Papanna, Mohan Kumar; Holla, Ramesh; Uppal, Surabhi.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 8, e72247, 28.08.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perceptions and Practices of Self-Medication among Medical Students in Coastal South India

AU - Kumar, Nithin

AU - Kanchan, Tanuj

AU - Unnikrishnan, Bhaskaran

AU - Rekha, T.

AU - Mithra, Prasanna

AU - Kulkarni, Vaman

AU - Papanna, Mohan Kumar

AU - Holla, Ramesh

AU - Uppal, Surabhi

PY - 2013/8/28

Y1 - 2013/8/28

N2 - Self-medication is a common practice worldwide and the irrational use of drugs is a cause of concern. This study assessed the prevalence of self-medication among the medical students in South India. The data was analysed using SPSS version 11.5. A total of 440 students were included in the study. The prevalence of self-medication was 78.6%. A larger number of females were self-medicating (81.2%) than males (75.3%). The majority of the students self-medicated because of the illness being too trivial for consultation (70.5%). Antipyretics were most commonly self-medicated by the participants (74.8%). Only 47% of the participants opined that self-medication was a part of self-care and it needs to be encouraged. 39.3% of the participants perceived that the supply of medicine without prescription by the pharmacist can prevent the growing trend of self-medication. Easy availability and accessibility to health care facilities remains the cornerstone for reducing the practice of self-medication.

AB - Self-medication is a common practice worldwide and the irrational use of drugs is a cause of concern. This study assessed the prevalence of self-medication among the medical students in South India. The data was analysed using SPSS version 11.5. A total of 440 students were included in the study. The prevalence of self-medication was 78.6%. A larger number of females were self-medicating (81.2%) than males (75.3%). The majority of the students self-medicated because of the illness being too trivial for consultation (70.5%). Antipyretics were most commonly self-medicated by the participants (74.8%). Only 47% of the participants opined that self-medication was a part of self-care and it needs to be encouraged. 39.3% of the participants perceived that the supply of medicine without prescription by the pharmacist can prevent the growing trend of self-medication. Easy availability and accessibility to health care facilities remains the cornerstone for reducing the practice of self-medication.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84883180696&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84883180696&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0072247

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0072247

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 8

M1 - e72247

ER -