Perinatally acquired HIV-1 infection: Prevention and evaluation of HIV-exposed infants

Avinash K. Shetty

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the primary cause of pediatric HIV infections. In recent years, perinatal HIV-1 transmission rates in the United States have declined markedly because of several factors that include enhanced voluntary counseling and HIV-1 testing (VCT) for pregnant women, widespread use of antiretroviral prophylaxis or combination antiretroviral therapy, avoidance of breastfeeding, and elective cesarean delivery. However, perinatal transmission of HIV-1 still occurs, and 300 to 400 infected infants are born annually, primarily because of missed prevention opportunities. The pediatrician plays a vital role in the prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV-1 by identifying newborns born to infected mothers who were not tested during pregnancy, administering antiretroviral prophylaxis, and ensuring follow-up to confirm or exclude the diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in early infancy. This article reviews recent advances in the prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV-1, discusses evaluation and treatment of infants exposed to HIV-1, and highlights certain unique features of HIV-1 infections in infants, with a focus on early diagnosis, clinical manifestations, treatment, and prognosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)282-295
Number of pages14
JournalSeminars in Pediatric Infectious Diseases
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-10-2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Virus Diseases
HIV-1
HIV
Breast Feeding
HIV Infections
Counseling
Pregnant Women
Early Diagnosis
Therapeutics
Mothers
Newborn Infant
Pediatrics
Pregnancy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

@article{8a3da6300eb24d5eb44f22af93ef85f8,
title = "Perinatally acquired HIV-1 infection: Prevention and evaluation of HIV-exposed infants",
abstract = "Perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the primary cause of pediatric HIV infections. In recent years, perinatal HIV-1 transmission rates in the United States have declined markedly because of several factors that include enhanced voluntary counseling and HIV-1 testing (VCT) for pregnant women, widespread use of antiretroviral prophylaxis or combination antiretroviral therapy, avoidance of breastfeeding, and elective cesarean delivery. However, perinatal transmission of HIV-1 still occurs, and 300 to 400 infected infants are born annually, primarily because of missed prevention opportunities. The pediatrician plays a vital role in the prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV-1 by identifying newborns born to infected mothers who were not tested during pregnancy, administering antiretroviral prophylaxis, and ensuring follow-up to confirm or exclude the diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in early infancy. This article reviews recent advances in the prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV-1, discusses evaluation and treatment of infants exposed to HIV-1, and highlights certain unique features of HIV-1 infections in infants, with a focus on early diagnosis, clinical manifestations, treatment, and prognosis.",
author = "Shetty, {Avinash K.}",
year = "2005",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1053/j.spid.2005.06.008",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "282--295",
journal = "Seminars in Pediatric Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1045-1870",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "4",

}

Perinatally acquired HIV-1 infection : Prevention and evaluation of HIV-exposed infants. / Shetty, Avinash K.

In: Seminars in Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Vol. 16, No. 4, 01.10.2005, p. 282-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perinatally acquired HIV-1 infection

T2 - Prevention and evaluation of HIV-exposed infants

AU - Shetty, Avinash K.

PY - 2005/10/1

Y1 - 2005/10/1

N2 - Perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the primary cause of pediatric HIV infections. In recent years, perinatal HIV-1 transmission rates in the United States have declined markedly because of several factors that include enhanced voluntary counseling and HIV-1 testing (VCT) for pregnant women, widespread use of antiretroviral prophylaxis or combination antiretroviral therapy, avoidance of breastfeeding, and elective cesarean delivery. However, perinatal transmission of HIV-1 still occurs, and 300 to 400 infected infants are born annually, primarily because of missed prevention opportunities. The pediatrician plays a vital role in the prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV-1 by identifying newborns born to infected mothers who were not tested during pregnancy, administering antiretroviral prophylaxis, and ensuring follow-up to confirm or exclude the diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in early infancy. This article reviews recent advances in the prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV-1, discusses evaluation and treatment of infants exposed to HIV-1, and highlights certain unique features of HIV-1 infections in infants, with a focus on early diagnosis, clinical manifestations, treatment, and prognosis.

AB - Perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the primary cause of pediatric HIV infections. In recent years, perinatal HIV-1 transmission rates in the United States have declined markedly because of several factors that include enhanced voluntary counseling and HIV-1 testing (VCT) for pregnant women, widespread use of antiretroviral prophylaxis or combination antiretroviral therapy, avoidance of breastfeeding, and elective cesarean delivery. However, perinatal transmission of HIV-1 still occurs, and 300 to 400 infected infants are born annually, primarily because of missed prevention opportunities. The pediatrician plays a vital role in the prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV-1 by identifying newborns born to infected mothers who were not tested during pregnancy, administering antiretroviral prophylaxis, and ensuring follow-up to confirm or exclude the diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in early infancy. This article reviews recent advances in the prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV-1, discusses evaluation and treatment of infants exposed to HIV-1, and highlights certain unique features of HIV-1 infections in infants, with a focus on early diagnosis, clinical manifestations, treatment, and prognosis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=26444526703&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=26444526703&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1053/j.spid.2005.06.008

DO - 10.1053/j.spid.2005.06.008

M3 - Review article

C2 - 16210108

AN - SCOPUS:26444526703

VL - 16

SP - 282

EP - 295

JO - Seminars in Pediatric Infectious Diseases

JF - Seminars in Pediatric Infectious Diseases

SN - 1045-1870

IS - 4

ER -