Phytotherapy-Safety aspects

A. Shirwaikar, R. Verma, R. Lobo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plants have been used since ancient times as medicines for the treatment of a range of diseases. In spite of the great advances observed in modern medicine in recent decades, plants still make an important contribution to health care. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), because of poverty and lack of access to modern medicine, about 65-80% of the world's population that are living in developing countries depend essentially on plants for primary health care. Phytotherapeutic agents are herbal preparations consisting of complex mixtures of one or more plants which contain active ingredients, plant parts or plant material in the crude or processed state. The data existing for most plants to guarantee their quality, efficacy and safety is insufficient. The concept that herbal drugs are safe and free from side effects is not always. Plants contain hundreds of constituents, some of which are very toxic namely the most cytotoxic anti-cancer plant-derived drugs is pyrrolidine alkaloids, etc. However, the adverse effects of phytotherapeutic agents are less as compared with synthetic drugs. Several regulatory models for herbal medicines are currently available including prescription drugs, over-the-counter substances, traditional medicines and dietary supplements. Harmonization and improvement in the processes of regulation is needed for safety aspects related to phytotherapy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-63
Number of pages9
JournalNatural Product Radiance
Volume8
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Phytotherapy
Safety
Modern 1601-history
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Plant Preparations
Prescription Drugs
Herbal Medicine
Poisons
Traditional Medicine
Poverty
Dietary Supplements
Complex Mixtures
Alkaloids
Developing Countries
Primary Health Care
Delivery of Health Care

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Shirwaikar, A., Verma, R., & Lobo, R. (2009). Phytotherapy-Safety aspects. Natural Product Radiance, 8(1), 55-63.
Shirwaikar, A. ; Verma, R. ; Lobo, R. / Phytotherapy-Safety aspects. In: Natural Product Radiance. 2009 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 55-63.
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abstract = "Plants have been used since ancient times as medicines for the treatment of a range of diseases. In spite of the great advances observed in modern medicine in recent decades, plants still make an important contribution to health care. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), because of poverty and lack of access to modern medicine, about 65-80{\%} of the world's population that are living in developing countries depend essentially on plants for primary health care. Phytotherapeutic agents are herbal preparations consisting of complex mixtures of one or more plants which contain active ingredients, plant parts or plant material in the crude or processed state. The data existing for most plants to guarantee their quality, efficacy and safety is insufficient. The concept that herbal drugs are safe and free from side effects is not always. Plants contain hundreds of constituents, some of which are very toxic namely the most cytotoxic anti-cancer plant-derived drugs is pyrrolidine alkaloids, etc. However, the adverse effects of phytotherapeutic agents are less as compared with synthetic drugs. Several regulatory models for herbal medicines are currently available including prescription drugs, over-the-counter substances, traditional medicines and dietary supplements. Harmonization and improvement in the processes of regulation is needed for safety aspects related to phytotherapy.",
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note = "Cited By :11 Export Date: 10 November 2017 Correspondence Address: Shirwaikar, A.; Department of Pharmacognosy, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal-576104, Karnataka, India; email: annieshirwaikar@yahoo.com References: De Smet, P.A.G.M., The role of plant derived drugs and herbal medicines in healthcare (1997) Drugs, 54, pp. 801-840; Blumenthal, M., Harvard study estimates consumers spend $5.1 billion on herbal products? (1999) Herbal Gram, 45, pp. 68-74; Blumenthal, M., Herb industry sees mergers, acquisitions, and entry by pharmaceutical giants in 1998 (1999) HerbalGram, 45, pp. 67-68; MCA Press Releases: Concern over Quality and Safety Standards of Traditional Chinese Medicines, September 2001; MCA Notifications on Safety of Kava-kava products, December 2001-July 2002; Gr{\"u}nwald, J., figures, trends, analysis (1995) Herbal Gram, 34, pp. 60-65. , The European phytomedicines market; Roberts, J.E., Tyler, V.E., (1998) Tyler's Herbs of Choice, The Therapeutic Use of Phytomedicinals, , The Haworth Press,Inc, New York; Blumenthal, M., Brusse, W.R., Goldberg, A., Gruenwald, J., Hall, T., Riggins, C.W., Rister, R.S., (1998) The Complete German Commission E Monographs, Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines, , The American Botanical Council, Austin, TX, USA; De Smet, P.A.G.M., Health Risks of Herbal Remedies (1995) Drug Safety, 13 (2), pp. 81-93; Barnes, J., Mills, S.Y., Abbot, N.C., Willoughby, M., Ernst, E., Different standards for reporting ADRs to herbal remedies and conventional OTC medicines: Face-to-face interviews with 515 users of herbal remedies (1998) Brit J Clinic Pharmacol, 45, pp. 496-500; De Smet, P.A.G.M., Adverse Effects of Herbal Remedies (1997) Adv Drug React Bull, 183, pp. 695-698; Shaw, D., Traditional remedies and food supplements, A 5-year toxicological study (1997) Drug Safety, 17, pp. 342-356; Baldwin, C.A., Anderson, L.A., Phillipson, J.D., What pharmacists should know about ginseng (1986) Pharm J, 237, pp. 583-586; D'Arcy, P.F., Adverse reactions and interactions with herbal medicines, Part 1. Adverse reactions (1991) Adverse Drug React Toxicol Rev, 10, pp. 189-208; Baldwin, C.A., Anderson, I.A., Phillipson, J.D., What pharmacists should know about feverfew (1987) Pharm J, 239, pp. 237-238; Tisserand, R., Balacs, T., (1995) Essential oil safety, , Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone; De Smet, P.A.G.M., (1992) Aristolochiaspecies in Adverse effects of herbal drugs, 1. , Berlin: Springer Verlag; D'ArcyPF, Adverse reactions and interactions with herbal medicines, Part (1991) Adverse Drug React Toxicol Rev, 10, pp. 189-208; Mattocks, A.R., (1986) Chemistry and toxicology of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, , New York: Academic Press; Anderson, L.A., Phillipson, J.D., Mistietoe -The magic herb (1982) Pharm J, 229, pp. 437-439; Tyler, V.E., (1993) The Honest Herbal, , 3rd Edn. New York: Howarth Press; Chandler, R.F., Phillipson, J.D., Anderson, L.A., Controversial laetrile (1984) Pharm J, 232, pp. 330-332; Statutory Instrument (SI) 1984:87. The Medicines (Cyanogenetic Substances) Order, 1984; Ljunggren, B., Severe phototoxic burn following celery ingestion (1990) Arch Dermatol, 126, pp. 1334-1336; Boffa, M.J., Gilmour, E., Ead, R.D., Celery soup causing severe phototoxicily during PUVA therapy (1996) Brit J Dermatol, 135, pp. 330-345; Psoralea corylifoliafruit in Traditional Chinese Medicines causing severe skin reaction, Current Problems (2001) Pharmacovigilance, 27, p. 12. , Medicines Control Agency; Ernst, E., Possible interactions between synthetic and herbal medicinal products (2000) Perfusion, 13, pp. 4-15; Fugh-Berman, A., Herb-drug interactions (2000) The Lancet, 355, pp. 134-138; Miller, L., Selected clinical considerations focusing on known and potential drug-herb interactions (1998) Arch Inter Med, 158, pp. 2200-2211. , 29; Brown, R., Potential interactrions of herbal medicines with antipsychotics, antidepressants and hypnotics (1997) Eur J Herb Med, 3 (2), pp. 25-28; Boyle, F., Herbal medicines can interfere with breast cancer treatment (1999) Med J Australia, , September 1 st, 286; European Pharmacopoeia, 4th edition, 2002, Strasbourg: Council of Europe, 2002; Cuzzolin, L., Safety implications regarding use of phytomedicine (2006) Eur J Clin Pharmacol, 62, pp. 37-42; Roulet, M., Laurini, R., Rivier, L., Calame, A., Hepatic veno-occlusive disease in newborn infant of a woman drinking herbal tea (1988) J Pediatr, 112, pp. 433-436; Allen, J.R., Are herbal teas safe for infants and children (1989) Austr Fam Physic, 18 (8), pp. 1017-1019; Ernst, E., Herbal Medications for common ailments in the elderly (1999) Drugs and Ageing, 15 (6), pp. 423-428; Mashour, N.H., Herbal medicine for the treatment of cardiovascular disease (1998) Arch Intern Med, 158, pp. 2225-2234; Ang-Lee, M.K., Moss, J., Yuan, C.-S., Herbal medicines and perioperative care (2001) J Amer Med Assoc, 286 (2), pp. 208-216; Zhou, S.F., Zhou, Z.W., Li, C.G., Chen, X., Yu, X., Xue, C.C., Herington, A., Identification of drugs that interact with herbs in drug development (2007) Drug Disc Today, 12, pp. 664-673. , 39",
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Shirwaikar, A, Verma, R & Lobo, R 2009, 'Phytotherapy-Safety aspects', Natural Product Radiance, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 55-63.

Phytotherapy-Safety aspects. / Shirwaikar, A.; Verma, R.; Lobo, R.

In: Natural Product Radiance, Vol. 8, No. 1, 2009, p. 55-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Phytotherapy-Safety aspects

AU - Shirwaikar, A.

AU - Verma, R.

AU - Lobo, R.

N1 - Cited By :11 Export Date: 10 November 2017 Correspondence Address: Shirwaikar, A.; Department of Pharmacognosy, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal-576104, Karnataka, India; email: annieshirwaikar@yahoo.com References: De Smet, P.A.G.M., The role of plant derived drugs and herbal medicines in healthcare (1997) Drugs, 54, pp. 801-840; Blumenthal, M., Harvard study estimates consumers spend $5.1 billion on herbal products? (1999) Herbal Gram, 45, pp. 68-74; Blumenthal, M., Herb industry sees mergers, acquisitions, and entry by pharmaceutical giants in 1998 (1999) HerbalGram, 45, pp. 67-68; MCA Press Releases: Concern over Quality and Safety Standards of Traditional Chinese Medicines, September 2001; MCA Notifications on Safety of Kava-kava products, December 2001-July 2002; Grünwald, J., figures, trends, analysis (1995) Herbal Gram, 34, pp. 60-65. , The European phytomedicines market; Roberts, J.E., Tyler, V.E., (1998) Tyler's Herbs of Choice, The Therapeutic Use of Phytomedicinals, , The Haworth Press,Inc, New York; Blumenthal, M., Brusse, W.R., Goldberg, A., Gruenwald, J., Hall, T., Riggins, C.W., Rister, R.S., (1998) The Complete German Commission E Monographs, Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines, , The American Botanical Council, Austin, TX, USA; De Smet, P.A.G.M., Health Risks of Herbal Remedies (1995) Drug Safety, 13 (2), pp. 81-93; Barnes, J., Mills, S.Y., Abbot, N.C., Willoughby, M., Ernst, E., Different standards for reporting ADRs to herbal remedies and conventional OTC medicines: Face-to-face interviews with 515 users of herbal remedies (1998) Brit J Clinic Pharmacol, 45, pp. 496-500; De Smet, P.A.G.M., Adverse Effects of Herbal Remedies (1997) Adv Drug React Bull, 183, pp. 695-698; Shaw, D., Traditional remedies and food supplements, A 5-year toxicological study (1997) Drug Safety, 17, pp. 342-356; Baldwin, C.A., Anderson, L.A., Phillipson, J.D., What pharmacists should know about ginseng (1986) Pharm J, 237, pp. 583-586; D'Arcy, P.F., Adverse reactions and interactions with herbal medicines, Part 1. Adverse reactions (1991) Adverse Drug React Toxicol Rev, 10, pp. 189-208; Baldwin, C.A., Anderson, I.A., Phillipson, J.D., What pharmacists should know about feverfew (1987) Pharm J, 239, pp. 237-238; Tisserand, R., Balacs, T., (1995) Essential oil safety, , Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone; De Smet, P.A.G.M., (1992) Aristolochiaspecies in Adverse effects of herbal drugs, 1. , Berlin: Springer Verlag; D'ArcyPF, Adverse reactions and interactions with herbal medicines, Part (1991) Adverse Drug React Toxicol Rev, 10, pp. 189-208; Mattocks, A.R., (1986) Chemistry and toxicology of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, , New York: Academic Press; Anderson, L.A., Phillipson, J.D., Mistietoe -The magic herb (1982) Pharm J, 229, pp. 437-439; Tyler, V.E., (1993) The Honest Herbal, , 3rd Edn. New York: Howarth Press; Chandler, R.F., Phillipson, J.D., Anderson, L.A., Controversial laetrile (1984) Pharm J, 232, pp. 330-332; Statutory Instrument (SI) 1984:87. The Medicines (Cyanogenetic Substances) Order, 1984; Ljunggren, B., Severe phototoxic burn following celery ingestion (1990) Arch Dermatol, 126, pp. 1334-1336; Boffa, M.J., Gilmour, E., Ead, R.D., Celery soup causing severe phototoxicily during PUVA therapy (1996) Brit J Dermatol, 135, pp. 330-345; Psoralea corylifoliafruit in Traditional Chinese Medicines causing severe skin reaction, Current Problems (2001) Pharmacovigilance, 27, p. 12. , Medicines Control Agency; Ernst, E., Possible interactions between synthetic and herbal medicinal products (2000) Perfusion, 13, pp. 4-15; Fugh-Berman, A., Herb-drug interactions (2000) The Lancet, 355, pp. 134-138; Miller, L., Selected clinical considerations focusing on known and potential drug-herb interactions (1998) Arch Inter Med, 158, pp. 2200-2211. , 29; Brown, R., Potential interactrions of herbal medicines with antipsychotics, antidepressants and hypnotics (1997) Eur J Herb Med, 3 (2), pp. 25-28; Boyle, F., Herbal medicines can interfere with breast cancer treatment (1999) Med J Australia, , September 1 st, 286; European Pharmacopoeia, 4th edition, 2002, Strasbourg: Council of Europe, 2002; Cuzzolin, L., Safety implications regarding use of phytomedicine (2006) Eur J Clin Pharmacol, 62, pp. 37-42; Roulet, M., Laurini, R., Rivier, L., Calame, A., Hepatic veno-occlusive disease in newborn infant of a woman drinking herbal tea (1988) J Pediatr, 112, pp. 433-436; Allen, J.R., Are herbal teas safe for infants and children (1989) Austr Fam Physic, 18 (8), pp. 1017-1019; Ernst, E., Herbal Medications for common ailments in the elderly (1999) Drugs and Ageing, 15 (6), pp. 423-428; Mashour, N.H., Herbal medicine for the treatment of cardiovascular disease (1998) Arch Intern Med, 158, pp. 2225-2234; Ang-Lee, M.K., Moss, J., Yuan, C.-S., Herbal medicines and perioperative care (2001) J Amer Med Assoc, 286 (2), pp. 208-216; Zhou, S.F., Zhou, Z.W., Li, C.G., Chen, X., Yu, X., Xue, C.C., Herington, A., Identification of drugs that interact with herbs in drug development (2007) Drug Disc Today, 12, pp. 664-673. , 39

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Plants have been used since ancient times as medicines for the treatment of a range of diseases. In spite of the great advances observed in modern medicine in recent decades, plants still make an important contribution to health care. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), because of poverty and lack of access to modern medicine, about 65-80% of the world's population that are living in developing countries depend essentially on plants for primary health care. Phytotherapeutic agents are herbal preparations consisting of complex mixtures of one or more plants which contain active ingredients, plant parts or plant material in the crude or processed state. The data existing for most plants to guarantee their quality, efficacy and safety is insufficient. The concept that herbal drugs are safe and free from side effects is not always. Plants contain hundreds of constituents, some of which are very toxic namely the most cytotoxic anti-cancer plant-derived drugs is pyrrolidine alkaloids, etc. However, the adverse effects of phytotherapeutic agents are less as compared with synthetic drugs. Several regulatory models for herbal medicines are currently available including prescription drugs, over-the-counter substances, traditional medicines and dietary supplements. Harmonization and improvement in the processes of regulation is needed for safety aspects related to phytotherapy.

AB - Plants have been used since ancient times as medicines for the treatment of a range of diseases. In spite of the great advances observed in modern medicine in recent decades, plants still make an important contribution to health care. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), because of poverty and lack of access to modern medicine, about 65-80% of the world's population that are living in developing countries depend essentially on plants for primary health care. Phytotherapeutic agents are herbal preparations consisting of complex mixtures of one or more plants which contain active ingredients, plant parts or plant material in the crude or processed state. The data existing for most plants to guarantee their quality, efficacy and safety is insufficient. The concept that herbal drugs are safe and free from side effects is not always. Plants contain hundreds of constituents, some of which are very toxic namely the most cytotoxic anti-cancer plant-derived drugs is pyrrolidine alkaloids, etc. However, the adverse effects of phytotherapeutic agents are less as compared with synthetic drugs. Several regulatory models for herbal medicines are currently available including prescription drugs, over-the-counter substances, traditional medicines and dietary supplements. Harmonization and improvement in the processes of regulation is needed for safety aspects related to phytotherapy.

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 55

EP - 63

JO - Natural Product Radiance

JF - Natural Product Radiance

SN - 0972-592X

IS - 1

ER -

Shirwaikar A, Verma R, Lobo R. Phytotherapy-Safety aspects. Natural Product Radiance. 2009;8(1):55-63.