Post-traumatic epilepsy: An overview

Amit Agrawal, Jake Timothy, Lekha Pandit, Murali Manju

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

131 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) is a recurrent seizure disorder secondary to brain injury following head trauma. PTE is not a homogeneous condition and can appear several years after the head injury. The mechanism by which trauma to the brain tissue leads to recurrent seizures is unknown. Cortical lesions seem important in the genesis of the epileptic activity, and early seizures are likely to have a different pathogenesis than late seizures. Anti-epileptic drugs available for treatment are phenytoin, sodium valproate, and carbamazepine. Newer anti-epileptics are helpful, particularly in patients with associated post-traumatic stress disorders; however, no randomized controlled studies are available to prove that one of these drugs is better than the other. Current evidence is that the treatment of early post-traumatic seizures does not influence the incidence of post-traumatic epilepsy. Routine preventive anticonvulsants are not indicated for patients with head injuries, and treatment in the acute phase does not reduce death or disability rates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)433-439
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Neurology and Neurosurgery
Volume108
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 07-2006

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Post-Traumatic Epilepsy
Craniocerebral Trauma
Seizures
Carbamazepine
Valproic Acid
Phenytoin
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Anticonvulsants
Brain Injuries
Epilepsy
Therapeutics
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Agrawal, Amit ; Timothy, Jake ; Pandit, Lekha ; Manju, Murali. / Post-traumatic epilepsy : An overview. In: Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery. 2006 ; Vol. 108, No. 5. pp. 433-439.
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Post-traumatic epilepsy : An overview. / Agrawal, Amit; Timothy, Jake; Pandit, Lekha; Manju, Murali.

In: Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery, Vol. 108, No. 5, 07.2006, p. 433-439.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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