Preponderant use of fresh-frozen plasma in children despite weaker evidence

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Considering the higher use of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) in our hospital, we desired to determine the pattern, prevalence, and potential complications of its utilization in new-born and children with the primary aim to observe its effect on the conventional coagulation screening (CCS) parameters. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Patients' demographics, clinical indications, and pre-and posttransfusion CCS parameters such as the prothrombin time, the international normalized ratio (INR), and partial thromboplastin time were observed over a period of 10 months. Any improvement observed in the laboratory parameters after FFP transfusion was noted. RESULTS: We studied 433 episodes, where 499 FFP units were utilized in 184 patients. Mean age in years was 6 ± 0.16 (new-born to 17). Diagnoses-wise majority had diffuse intravascular coagulation with sepsis 25% (46/184) followed by febrile illness 23% (42/184). Around 46% (84/184) patients had bleeding episodes of which four had known family history of bleeding (three factors IX and one factor XI deficiency). Mean doses of FFP utilized (mL/kg) in children and infants were 12.6 ± 6.3 (n = 297 episodes) and 14.4 ± 6.3 (n = 136 episodes), respectively (P = 0.006). Mean change in INR in the cohort with deranged coagulation parameters against the overtly bleeding cohort was 0.85 versus 0.40 (P = 0.006). CONCLUSION: The study elicits minimal evidence in correcting the coagulation parameters, especially in the infants, whenever FFP was transfused prophylactically. Joint-decision making of the pediatricians and transfusion medicine physician would promote judicious use in children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-14
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Applied Hematology
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2019

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology

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