Prevalence and correlates of tobacco use amongst junior collegiates in twin cities of western Nepal: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey

Chandrashekhar T. Sreeramareddy, P. V. Kishore, Jagadish Paudel, Ritesh G. Menezes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. College students are vulnerable to tobacco addiction. Tobacco industries often target college students for marketing. Studies about prevalence of tobacco use and its correlates among college students in Nepal are lacking. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in two cities of western Nepal during January-March, 2007. A pre-tested, anonymous, self-administered questionnaire (in Nepali) adapted from Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) and a World Bank study was administered to a representative sample of 1600 students selected from 13 junior colleges by two-stage stratified random sampling. Results. Overall prevalence of 'ever users' of tobacco products was 13.9%. Prevalence among boys and girls was 20.5% and 2.9% respectively. Prevalence of 'current users' was 10.2% (cigarette smoking: 9.4%, smokeless products: 6.5%, and both forms: 5.7%). Median age at initiation of cigarette smoking and chewable tobacco was 16 and 15 years respectively. Among the current cigarette smokers, 58.7% (88/150) were smoking at least one cigarette per day. Most (67.8%) 'Current users' purchased tobacco products by themselves from stores or got them from friends. Most of them (66.7%) smoked in tea stalls or restaurants followed by other public places (13.2%). The average daily expenditure was 20 Nepalese rupees (∼0.3 USD) and most (59%) students reported of having adequate money to buy tobacco products. Majority (82%) of the students were exposed to tobacco advertisements through magazines/newspapers, and advertising hoardings during a period of 30 days prior to survey. The correlates of tobacco use were: age, gender, household asset score and knowledge about health risks, family members, teachers and friends using tobacco products, and purchasing tobacco products for family members. Conclusion. School/college-based interventions like counseling to promote cessation among current users and tobacco education to prevent initiation are necessary. Enforcement of legislations to decrease availability, accessibility and affordability of tobacco products and policies to change social norms of tobacco use among parents and teachers are necessary to curb the tobacco use among college students.

Original languageEnglish
Article number97
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21-04-2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nepal
Tobacco Use
Tobacco Products
Students
Tobacco
Smoking
Cross-Sectional Studies
Lobeline
Tobacco Industry
Restaurants
Newspapers
Surveys and Questionnaires
United Nations
Tea
Health Expenditures
Marketing
Legislation
Counseling
Parents
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T. ; Kishore, P. V. ; Paudel, Jagadish ; Menezes, Ritesh G. / Prevalence and correlates of tobacco use amongst junior collegiates in twin cities of western Nepal : A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey. In: BMC Public Health. 2008 ; Vol. 8.
@article{bd648f7d635346848791ef1b37043ed8,
title = "Prevalence and correlates of tobacco use amongst junior collegiates in twin cities of western Nepal: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey",
abstract = "Background. College students are vulnerable to tobacco addiction. Tobacco industries often target college students for marketing. Studies about prevalence of tobacco use and its correlates among college students in Nepal are lacking. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in two cities of western Nepal during January-March, 2007. A pre-tested, anonymous, self-administered questionnaire (in Nepali) adapted from Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) and a World Bank study was administered to a representative sample of 1600 students selected from 13 junior colleges by two-stage stratified random sampling. Results. Overall prevalence of 'ever users' of tobacco products was 13.9{\%}. Prevalence among boys and girls was 20.5{\%} and 2.9{\%} respectively. Prevalence of 'current users' was 10.2{\%} (cigarette smoking: 9.4{\%}, smokeless products: 6.5{\%}, and both forms: 5.7{\%}). Median age at initiation of cigarette smoking and chewable tobacco was 16 and 15 years respectively. Among the current cigarette smokers, 58.7{\%} (88/150) were smoking at least one cigarette per day. Most (67.8{\%}) 'Current users' purchased tobacco products by themselves from stores or got them from friends. Most of them (66.7{\%}) smoked in tea stalls or restaurants followed by other public places (13.2{\%}). The average daily expenditure was 20 Nepalese rupees (∼0.3 USD) and most (59{\%}) students reported of having adequate money to buy tobacco products. Majority (82{\%}) of the students were exposed to tobacco advertisements through magazines/newspapers, and advertising hoardings during a period of 30 days prior to survey. The correlates of tobacco use were: age, gender, household asset score and knowledge about health risks, family members, teachers and friends using tobacco products, and purchasing tobacco products for family members. Conclusion. School/college-based interventions like counseling to promote cessation among current users and tobacco education to prevent initiation are necessary. Enforcement of legislations to decrease availability, accessibility and affordability of tobacco products and policies to change social norms of tobacco use among parents and teachers are necessary to curb the tobacco use among college students.",
author = "Sreeramareddy, {Chandrashekhar T.} and Kishore, {P. V.} and Jagadish Paudel and Menezes, {Ritesh G.}",
year = "2008",
month = "4",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1186/1471-2458-8-97",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "BMC Public Health",
issn = "1471-2458",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

Prevalence and correlates of tobacco use amongst junior collegiates in twin cities of western Nepal : A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey. / Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T.; Kishore, P. V.; Paudel, Jagadish; Menezes, Ritesh G.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 8, 97, 21.04.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence and correlates of tobacco use amongst junior collegiates in twin cities of western Nepal

T2 - A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey

AU - Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T.

AU - Kishore, P. V.

AU - Paudel, Jagadish

AU - Menezes, Ritesh G.

PY - 2008/4/21

Y1 - 2008/4/21

N2 - Background. College students are vulnerable to tobacco addiction. Tobacco industries often target college students for marketing. Studies about prevalence of tobacco use and its correlates among college students in Nepal are lacking. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in two cities of western Nepal during January-March, 2007. A pre-tested, anonymous, self-administered questionnaire (in Nepali) adapted from Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) and a World Bank study was administered to a representative sample of 1600 students selected from 13 junior colleges by two-stage stratified random sampling. Results. Overall prevalence of 'ever users' of tobacco products was 13.9%. Prevalence among boys and girls was 20.5% and 2.9% respectively. Prevalence of 'current users' was 10.2% (cigarette smoking: 9.4%, smokeless products: 6.5%, and both forms: 5.7%). Median age at initiation of cigarette smoking and chewable tobacco was 16 and 15 years respectively. Among the current cigarette smokers, 58.7% (88/150) were smoking at least one cigarette per day. Most (67.8%) 'Current users' purchased tobacco products by themselves from stores or got them from friends. Most of them (66.7%) smoked in tea stalls or restaurants followed by other public places (13.2%). The average daily expenditure was 20 Nepalese rupees (∼0.3 USD) and most (59%) students reported of having adequate money to buy tobacco products. Majority (82%) of the students were exposed to tobacco advertisements through magazines/newspapers, and advertising hoardings during a period of 30 days prior to survey. The correlates of tobacco use were: age, gender, household asset score and knowledge about health risks, family members, teachers and friends using tobacco products, and purchasing tobacco products for family members. Conclusion. School/college-based interventions like counseling to promote cessation among current users and tobacco education to prevent initiation are necessary. Enforcement of legislations to decrease availability, accessibility and affordability of tobacco products and policies to change social norms of tobacco use among parents and teachers are necessary to curb the tobacco use among college students.

AB - Background. College students are vulnerable to tobacco addiction. Tobacco industries often target college students for marketing. Studies about prevalence of tobacco use and its correlates among college students in Nepal are lacking. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in two cities of western Nepal during January-March, 2007. A pre-tested, anonymous, self-administered questionnaire (in Nepali) adapted from Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) and a World Bank study was administered to a representative sample of 1600 students selected from 13 junior colleges by two-stage stratified random sampling. Results. Overall prevalence of 'ever users' of tobacco products was 13.9%. Prevalence among boys and girls was 20.5% and 2.9% respectively. Prevalence of 'current users' was 10.2% (cigarette smoking: 9.4%, smokeless products: 6.5%, and both forms: 5.7%). Median age at initiation of cigarette smoking and chewable tobacco was 16 and 15 years respectively. Among the current cigarette smokers, 58.7% (88/150) were smoking at least one cigarette per day. Most (67.8%) 'Current users' purchased tobacco products by themselves from stores or got them from friends. Most of them (66.7%) smoked in tea stalls or restaurants followed by other public places (13.2%). The average daily expenditure was 20 Nepalese rupees (∼0.3 USD) and most (59%) students reported of having adequate money to buy tobacco products. Majority (82%) of the students were exposed to tobacco advertisements through magazines/newspapers, and advertising hoardings during a period of 30 days prior to survey. The correlates of tobacco use were: age, gender, household asset score and knowledge about health risks, family members, teachers and friends using tobacco products, and purchasing tobacco products for family members. Conclusion. School/college-based interventions like counseling to promote cessation among current users and tobacco education to prevent initiation are necessary. Enforcement of legislations to decrease availability, accessibility and affordability of tobacco products and policies to change social norms of tobacco use among parents and teachers are necessary to curb the tobacco use among college students.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=42149160725&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=42149160725&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/1471-2458-8-97

DO - 10.1186/1471-2458-8-97

M3 - Article

C2 - 18366781

AN - SCOPUS:42149160725

VL - 8

JO - BMC Public Health

JF - BMC Public Health

SN - 1471-2458

M1 - 97

ER -