Prevalence and pattern of drug use amongst college students

K. C. Dube, A. Kumar, N. Kumar, S. P. Gupta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This is a report on the study of the prevalence and pattern of the use of dependence‐producing drugs on 1,192 postgraduate students from the faculties of Arts, Science and Commerce and final year undergraduate medical students. The overall prevalence rate of drug use was 50.08 % (65.22 % in medical and 34.85 % in non‐medical students). The highest drug use (76.43 %) was among male medical students. Male students preferred to use alcohol and bhang while femala had a preference for meprobamate followed by alcohol. In the majority of cases, the age of initiation was in the “teens”. “Friends” were most responsible for suggesting drug use, although “more than one” influencing agents out‐numbered all the single influencing agents. Parents were found to have a significantly “tolerant” attitude towards drug use by their off‐spring. “Personal reasons” were not responsible for indulgence in or abstaining from drug use. L.S.D. users had the maximum number of after‐effects. The effects experienced in respect of most drugs were generally unpleasant and sometimes contrary to the expectations of users. Most “non‐users” and “infrequent users” did not favour self‐decision for drug indulgence though some “moderate” and “frequent” users were in favour of giving this freedom for some substances. Stringent measum against drug use among students were advocated by all drug users. More males, particularly male medical students, than females reported drug experience. Among male users, religion, caste, earlier education, residence (both sexes), employment status, occupation of the father, parental education and family income (among females as well) were the variables found to be significantly associated with drug use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)336-356
Number of pages21
JournalActa Psychiatrica Scandinavica
Volume57
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-1978
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Students
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Medical Students
Alcohols
Meprobamate
Education
Lysergic Acid Diethylamide
Religion
Cannabis
Art
Drug Users
Occupations
Social Class
Fathers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Dube, K. C. ; Kumar, A. ; Kumar, N. ; Gupta, S. P. / Prevalence and pattern of drug use amongst college students. In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 1978 ; Vol. 57, No. 4. pp. 336-356.
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Prevalence and pattern of drug use amongst college students. / Dube, K. C.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, N.; Gupta, S. P.

In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, Vol. 57, No. 4, 01.01.1978, p. 336-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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