Prevalence and predictors of postpartum depression among mothers in the rural areas of Udupi Taluk, Karnataka, India: A cross-sectional study

Anamika Agarwala, P. Arathi Rao, Prakash Narayanan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common affective disorder and is considered as an important public health problem as most of the time it remains unrecognized and affects the health of not only the mother but also the interpersonal relationships, mother-infant bonding as well as emotional and cognitive development of the baby. Objective: To estimate the prevalence and analyze the factors associated with PPD. Settings and design: A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in rural areas of Udupi Taluk, Karnataka over a period of six months. Methods and material: Four hundred ten (410) postnatal women within six months of their deliveries were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire, and were screened using Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Statistical analysis: Descriptive analysis was done on socio-demographic variables, obstetric, neonatal and postnatal and psychosocial factors. Logistic regression was carried to analyze the factors associated with PPD. Results: Prevalence of PPD was 21.5%. Higher level of maternal and paternal educational status, labour complications, more than two children, history of an abortion and sleeping difficulty of the mothers were found to be statistically significant for PPD. Conclusion: Early identification of symptoms and timely referral to appropriate health care provider can prevent major depression in the postnatal period. Key messages: Higher level of educational status of mothers was found to be a risk factor whereas educated fathers were protective for PPD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)342-345
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Epidemiology and Global Health
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-09-2019

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Postpartum Depression
India
Cross-Sectional Studies
Mothers
Educational Status
Statistical Factor Analysis
Obstetric Labor Complications
Induced Abortion
Mood Disorders
Fathers
Health Personnel
Obstetrics
Referral and Consultation
Public Health
Logistic Models
Demography
Psychology
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Prevalence and predictors of postpartum depression among mothers in the rural areas of Udupi Taluk, Karnataka, India: A cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Context: Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common affective disorder and is considered as an important public health problem as most of the time it remains unrecognized and affects the health of not only the mother but also the interpersonal relationships, mother-infant bonding as well as emotional and cognitive development of the baby. Objective: To estimate the prevalence and analyze the factors associated with PPD. Settings and design: A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in rural areas of Udupi Taluk, Karnataka over a period of six months. Methods and material: Four hundred ten (410) postnatal women within six months of their deliveries were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire, and were screened using Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Statistical analysis: Descriptive analysis was done on socio-demographic variables, obstetric, neonatal and postnatal and psychosocial factors. Logistic regression was carried to analyze the factors associated with PPD. Results: Prevalence of PPD was 21.5{\%}. Higher level of maternal and paternal educational status, labour complications, more than two children, history of an abortion and sleeping difficulty of the mothers were found to be statistically significant for PPD. Conclusion: Early identification of symptoms and timely referral to appropriate health care provider can prevent major depression in the postnatal period. Key messages: Higher level of educational status of mothers was found to be a risk factor whereas educated fathers were protective for PPD.",
author = "Anamika Agarwala and {Arathi Rao}, P. and Prakash Narayanan",
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