Prevalence and Risk Factors of Voice Problems Among Primary School Teachers in India

Usha Devadas, Rajashekhar Bellur, Santosh Maruthy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives Teachers are more prone to develop voice problems (VPs) when compared with other professional voice users. The aim of present study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of VPs among primary school teachers in India. Study design Epidemiological cross-sectional survey. Methods Self-reporting questionnaire data were collected from 1082 teachers. Results Out of 1082 teachers who participated in the present study, 188 teachers reported VPs that account for a prevalence rate of 17.4%. Tired voice after long hours of talking was the most frequently reported symptom, followed by sore/dry throat, strain in voice, neck muscle tension, and difficulty in projecting voice. The adjusted odds ratio values showed number of years of teaching, high background noise levels in the classroom, experiencing psychological stress while teaching classes, improper breath management (holding breath while speaking), poor focus of the tone (clenching jaw/teeth while speaking), upper respiratory tract infection, thyroid problems, and acid reflux as significant risk factors for the development of VPs in the current cohort of teachers. Conclusions Current results suggest that teachers develop VPs due to multiple risk factors. These factors may be either biological, psychomotor, or environment-related factors. A holistic approach (which could include educating teachers about voice care during their training, and if they develop VP during their career, then managing the VP by taking into consideration different risk factors) addressing all these factors needs to be adopted to prevent VPs in primary school teachers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117.e1-117.e10
JournalJournal of Voice
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2017

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India
School Teachers
Voice Training
Teaching
Breath Holding
Neck Muscles
Muscle Tonus
Pharyngitis
Jaw
Psychological Stress
Respiratory Tract Infections
Noise
Epidemiologic Studies
Tooth
Thyroid Gland
Research Design
Cross-Sectional Studies
Odds Ratio
Acids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Speech and Hearing
  • LPN and LVN

Cite this

Devadas, Usha ; Bellur, Rajashekhar ; Maruthy, Santosh. / Prevalence and Risk Factors of Voice Problems Among Primary School Teachers in India. In: Journal of Voice. 2017 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 117.e1-117.e10.
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Prevalence and Risk Factors of Voice Problems Among Primary School Teachers in India. / Devadas, Usha; Bellur, Rajashekhar; Maruthy, Santosh.

In: Journal of Voice, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 117.e1-117.e10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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