Prevalence of glenohumeral internal rotation deficit and its association with scapular dyskinesia and rotator cuff strength ratio in collegiate athletes playing overhead sports

Prateek Srivastav, Ganesh Balthillaya, Siddharth Bagrecha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Glenohumeral Internal Rotation Deficit (GIRD) indicates a 15° or greater loss of internal rotation of the throwing shoulder compared with the non-dominant shoulder. Aim: To estimate the prevalence of GIRD in collegiate overhead sports player and determine whether GIRD is associated with scapular dyskinesia and rotator cuff strength ratio. Materials and Methods: The present study was a Cross-sectional study. A total of 127 collegiate athletes were assessed for passive range of motion, external to internal rotation strength ratio (ER/IR ratio) and scapular dyskinesia for the throwing and non-throwing shoulder. Internal and external rotation of shoulder was measured using an inclinometer with the subject in prone and arm abducted to 90°. Scapular dyskinesia was measured using Lateral Scapula Slide test (LSST) and external to internal rotator strength was measured using a held hand isometric dynamometer. Chi-square test was used to find the association between GIRD and scapular dyskinesia and rotator cuff strength ratio. Results: Prevalence of GIRD (n=37) was found to be 29.1%. GIRD was not found to be associated with Scapular dyskinesia (p=0.237) and ER/IR strength ratio (p=0.411). Conclusion: Prevalence of GIRD in collegiate athletes playing overhead sports was found to be 29.1% and there was no association of GIRD with scapular dyskinesia, rotator cuff strength ratio.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-12-2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Biochemistry

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