Primary otomycosis in the indian subcontinent: Predisposing factors, microbiology, and classification

Sampath Chandra Prasad, Subbannayya Kotigadde, Manisha Shekhar, Nikhil Dinaker Thada, Prashanth Prabhu, Tina D'Souza, Kishore Chandra Prasad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To define otomycosis and determine the predisposing factors and microbiology in primary otomycosis. Study Design. Prospective study of two years and review of the literature. Setting. Academic Department of Otolaryngology in a coastal city in India. Patients. 150 immunocompetent individuals of whom 100 consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of otomycosis are considered as the study group and 50 consecutive patients with no otomycosis are considered as the control group. Results and Observations. Instillation of coconut oil (42%), use of topical antibiotic eardrops (20%), and compulsive cleaning of external ear with hard objects (32%) appeared to be the main predisposing factors in otomycosis. Aspergilli were the most common isolates (80%) followed by Penicillium (8%), Candida albicans (4%), Rhizopus (1%), and Chrysosporium (1%), the last being reported for the first time in otomycosis. Among aspergilli, A. niger complex (38%) was the most common followed by A. fumigatus complex (27%) and A. flavus complex (15%). Bacterial isolates associated with fungi in otomycosis were S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and Proteus spp. In 42% of healthy external ears fungi were isolated. Conclusion. Aspergillus spp. were the most common fungi isolated, followed by Penicillium. Otomycotic ears are often associated with bacterial isolates when compared to normal ears. Fungi are also present in a significant number of healthy external auditory canals and their profiles match those in cases of otomycosis. The use of terms "primary" and "secondary" otomycosis is important to standardize reporting.

Original languageEnglish
Article number636493
JournalInternational Journal of Microbiology
Volume2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2014
Externally publishedYes

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Otomycosis
Microbiology
Causality
Fungi
Aspergillus
External Ear
Penicillium
Ear
Chrysosporium
Rhizopus
Proteus
Ear Canal
Otolaryngology
Candida albicans
India

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Prasad, S. C., Kotigadde, S., Shekhar, M., Thada, N. D., Prabhu, P., D'Souza, T., & Prasad, K. C. (2014). Primary otomycosis in the indian subcontinent: Predisposing factors, microbiology, and classification. International Journal of Microbiology, 2014, [636493]. https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/636493
Prasad, Sampath Chandra ; Kotigadde, Subbannayya ; Shekhar, Manisha ; Thada, Nikhil Dinaker ; Prabhu, Prashanth ; D'Souza, Tina ; Prasad, Kishore Chandra. / Primary otomycosis in the indian subcontinent : Predisposing factors, microbiology, and classification. In: International Journal of Microbiology. 2014 ; Vol. 2014.
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Primary otomycosis in the indian subcontinent : Predisposing factors, microbiology, and classification. / Prasad, Sampath Chandra; Kotigadde, Subbannayya; Shekhar, Manisha; Thada, Nikhil Dinaker; Prabhu, Prashanth; D'Souza, Tina; Prasad, Kishore Chandra.

In: International Journal of Microbiology, Vol. 2014, 636493, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Objective. To define otomycosis and determine the predisposing factors and microbiology in primary otomycosis. Study Design. Prospective study of two years and review of the literature. Setting. Academic Department of Otolaryngology in a coastal city in India. Patients. 150 immunocompetent individuals of whom 100 consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of otomycosis are considered as the study group and 50 consecutive patients with no otomycosis are considered as the control group. Results and Observations. Instillation of coconut oil (42%), use of topical antibiotic eardrops (20%), and compulsive cleaning of external ear with hard objects (32%) appeared to be the main predisposing factors in otomycosis. Aspergilli were the most common isolates (80%) followed by Penicillium (8%), Candida albicans (4%), Rhizopus (1%), and Chrysosporium (1%), the last being reported for the first time in otomycosis. Among aspergilli, A. niger complex (38%) was the most common followed by A. fumigatus complex (27%) and A. flavus complex (15%). Bacterial isolates associated with fungi in otomycosis were S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and Proteus spp. In 42% of healthy external ears fungi were isolated. Conclusion. Aspergillus spp. were the most common fungi isolated, followed by Penicillium. Otomycotic ears are often associated with bacterial isolates when compared to normal ears. Fungi are also present in a significant number of healthy external auditory canals and their profiles match those in cases of otomycosis. The use of terms "primary" and "secondary" otomycosis is important to standardize reporting.

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