Production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil and its performance on four strokes IC engine

B. S.V.S.R. Krishna, B. K. Shivaraj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Majority of biodiesel is produced from plant oil (Jatropha, Pongamia, Mahua, Neem, Cotton seed oil etc.), which requires large land area to grow. The major drawback of production of biodiesel in large scale is the cost of raw materials. One of the satisfactory methods to limit the Biodiesel (Methyl esters) production cost is to employ low price/quality raw material, for instance biodiesel production using waste cooking oil (WCO). Simultaneously solves the disposal problem of waste cooking oil. This is socioeconomic and environment friendly and it does not compete with fresh food oil resources. Waste cooking oil collected from different hotels in and around Manipal/ Udupi of Karnataka, India. Transesterification reaction of WCO with methanol in presence of alkaline catalyst KOH has been accomplished in transesterification reactor. Experiments have been carried out at different operating conditions viz. catalyst loading (over the range of 0.4 to 3 wt %), oil to methanol ratio (1:3, 1:5, 1:6, 1:8, 1:9, 1:10 and 1:12), reaction temperature (50, 60 and 70 °C) and reaction time (40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 minutes) to identify optimized conditions for preparation of biodiesel. At these conditions gave that maximum yield (~91.60 %) of biodiesel at catalyst loading of 0.85 wt %, oil to methanol ratio of 1:8, reaction temperature of 60 °C and reaction time of 60 minutes. Biodiesel properties at different blends (B100, B30, B20, and B5) as prescribed by ASTM D6751-12 methods have been carried out. Its performance and emission test on diesel engine were also carried out.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-308
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Engineering and Technology(UAE)
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Biofuels
Cooking
Biodiesel
Oils
Stroke
Engines
Methanol
Transesterification
Catalysts
Raw materials
Reaction Time
Pongamia
Cottonseed oil
Jatropha
Plant Oils
Hotels
Costs and Cost Analysis
Temperature
Waste disposal
Diesel engines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Hardware and Architecture

Cite this

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abstract = "Majority of biodiesel is produced from plant oil (Jatropha, Pongamia, Mahua, Neem, Cotton seed oil etc.), which requires large land area to grow. The major drawback of production of biodiesel in large scale is the cost of raw materials. One of the satisfactory methods to limit the Biodiesel (Methyl esters) production cost is to employ low price/quality raw material, for instance biodiesel production using waste cooking oil (WCO). Simultaneously solves the disposal problem of waste cooking oil. This is socioeconomic and environment friendly and it does not compete with fresh food oil resources. Waste cooking oil collected from different hotels in and around Manipal/ Udupi of Karnataka, India. Transesterification reaction of WCO with methanol in presence of alkaline catalyst KOH has been accomplished in transesterification reactor. Experiments have been carried out at different operating conditions viz. catalyst loading (over the range of 0.4 to 3 wt {\%}), oil to methanol ratio (1:3, 1:5, 1:6, 1:8, 1:9, 1:10 and 1:12), reaction temperature (50, 60 and 70 °C) and reaction time (40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 minutes) to identify optimized conditions for preparation of biodiesel. At these conditions gave that maximum yield (~91.60 {\%}) of biodiesel at catalyst loading of 0.85 wt {\%}, oil to methanol ratio of 1:8, reaction temperature of 60 °C and reaction time of 60 minutes. Biodiesel properties at different blends (B100, B30, B20, and B5) as prescribed by ASTM D6751-12 methods have been carried out. Its performance and emission test on diesel engine were also carried out.",
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Production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil and its performance on four strokes IC engine. / Krishna, B. S.V.S.R.; Shivaraj, B. K.

In: International Journal of Engineering and Technology(UAE), Vol. 7, No. 4, 01.01.2018, p. 303-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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