Relationship between body mass index and dental caries among adolescent children in south India

H. M. Thippeswamy, N. Kumar, S. Acharya, K. C. Pentapati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and dental caries and to study the role of sweet consumption in predicting this relationship among adolescent children in Udupi district, India. Methods: The study population consisted of 463 school children in the 13-15-year age group. Anthropometric (height in metres and weight in kilograms) and caries measurements and decayed missing filled teeth (DMFT) index, were carried out by a trained recorder according to standard criteria. Results: The majority of the children were having low normal weight (BMI ≤ 25) with 18.6% classified as overweight (BMI 25-29.9) and 3.5% as obese (BMI = 30). The frequency of sweet consumption significantly increased from low normal weight children to overweight and obese children. Analysis showed that the obese group of children had more caries than the overweight and low normal weight children. Correlation analysis showed significant positive relation with BMI, decayed teeth (DT) [r = 0.254, p ≤ 0.001] and DMFT (r = 0.242, p ≤ 0.001). Binomial logistic regression showed that males (OR = 2.09, CI = 1.01, 4.33), obese/overweight children (OR = 3.68, CI = 1.79, 7.56) and those who consumed sweets more than once a day (OR = 3.13, CI = 1.25, 7.85) were more likely to have high caries experience. Conclusion: There was a significant association between overweight/obesity and caries experience among school children of the Udupi district. Obesity and dental caries have common risk determinants and require a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach by both medical and dental healthcare professionals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)581-586
Number of pages6
JournalWest Indian Medical Journal
Volume60
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 01-10-2011

Fingerprint

Dental Caries
India
Body Mass Index
DMF Index
Weights and Measures
Tooth
Obesity
Age Groups
Logistic Models
Delivery of Health Care

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{d2f8a2bda59040a095641fa94b3e3093,
title = "Relationship between body mass index and dental caries among adolescent children in south India",
abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and dental caries and to study the role of sweet consumption in predicting this relationship among adolescent children in Udupi district, India. Methods: The study population consisted of 463 school children in the 13-15-year age group. Anthropometric (height in metres and weight in kilograms) and caries measurements and decayed missing filled teeth (DMFT) index, were carried out by a trained recorder according to standard criteria. Results: The majority of the children were having low normal weight (BMI ≤ 25) with 18.6{\%} classified as overweight (BMI 25-29.9) and 3.5{\%} as obese (BMI = 30). The frequency of sweet consumption significantly increased from low normal weight children to overweight and obese children. Analysis showed that the obese group of children had more caries than the overweight and low normal weight children. Correlation analysis showed significant positive relation with BMI, decayed teeth (DT) [r = 0.254, p ≤ 0.001] and DMFT (r = 0.242, p ≤ 0.001). Binomial logistic regression showed that males (OR = 2.09, CI = 1.01, 4.33), obese/overweight children (OR = 3.68, CI = 1.79, 7.56) and those who consumed sweets more than once a day (OR = 3.13, CI = 1.25, 7.85) were more likely to have high caries experience. Conclusion: There was a significant association between overweight/obesity and caries experience among school children of the Udupi district. Obesity and dental caries have common risk determinants and require a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach by both medical and dental healthcare professionals.",
author = "Thippeswamy, {H. M.} and N. Kumar and S. Acharya and Pentapati, {K. C.}",
year = "2011",
month = "10",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "60",
pages = "581--586",
journal = "West Indian Medical Journal",
issn = "0043-3144",
publisher = "University of the West Indies",
number = "5",

}

Relationship between body mass index and dental caries among adolescent children in south India. / Thippeswamy, H. M.; Kumar, N.; Acharya, S.; Pentapati, K. C.

In: West Indian Medical Journal, Vol. 60, No. 5, 01.10.2011, p. 581-586.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationship between body mass index and dental caries among adolescent children in south India

AU - Thippeswamy, H. M.

AU - Kumar, N.

AU - Acharya, S.

AU - Pentapati, K. C.

PY - 2011/10/1

Y1 - 2011/10/1

N2 - Objective: To evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and dental caries and to study the role of sweet consumption in predicting this relationship among adolescent children in Udupi district, India. Methods: The study population consisted of 463 school children in the 13-15-year age group. Anthropometric (height in metres and weight in kilograms) and caries measurements and decayed missing filled teeth (DMFT) index, were carried out by a trained recorder according to standard criteria. Results: The majority of the children were having low normal weight (BMI ≤ 25) with 18.6% classified as overweight (BMI 25-29.9) and 3.5% as obese (BMI = 30). The frequency of sweet consumption significantly increased from low normal weight children to overweight and obese children. Analysis showed that the obese group of children had more caries than the overweight and low normal weight children. Correlation analysis showed significant positive relation with BMI, decayed teeth (DT) [r = 0.254, p ≤ 0.001] and DMFT (r = 0.242, p ≤ 0.001). Binomial logistic regression showed that males (OR = 2.09, CI = 1.01, 4.33), obese/overweight children (OR = 3.68, CI = 1.79, 7.56) and those who consumed sweets more than once a day (OR = 3.13, CI = 1.25, 7.85) were more likely to have high caries experience. Conclusion: There was a significant association between overweight/obesity and caries experience among school children of the Udupi district. Obesity and dental caries have common risk determinants and require a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach by both medical and dental healthcare professionals.

AB - Objective: To evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and dental caries and to study the role of sweet consumption in predicting this relationship among adolescent children in Udupi district, India. Methods: The study population consisted of 463 school children in the 13-15-year age group. Anthropometric (height in metres and weight in kilograms) and caries measurements and decayed missing filled teeth (DMFT) index, were carried out by a trained recorder according to standard criteria. Results: The majority of the children were having low normal weight (BMI ≤ 25) with 18.6% classified as overweight (BMI 25-29.9) and 3.5% as obese (BMI = 30). The frequency of sweet consumption significantly increased from low normal weight children to overweight and obese children. Analysis showed that the obese group of children had more caries than the overweight and low normal weight children. Correlation analysis showed significant positive relation with BMI, decayed teeth (DT) [r = 0.254, p ≤ 0.001] and DMFT (r = 0.242, p ≤ 0.001). Binomial logistic regression showed that males (OR = 2.09, CI = 1.01, 4.33), obese/overweight children (OR = 3.68, CI = 1.79, 7.56) and those who consumed sweets more than once a day (OR = 3.13, CI = 1.25, 7.85) were more likely to have high caries experience. Conclusion: There was a significant association between overweight/obesity and caries experience among school children of the Udupi district. Obesity and dental caries have common risk determinants and require a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach by both medical and dental healthcare professionals.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84860816334&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84860816334&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 60

SP - 581

EP - 586

JO - West Indian Medical Journal

JF - West Indian Medical Journal

SN - 0043-3144

IS - 5

ER -