Relationship between markers of lipid peroxidation, thiol oxidation and Glasgow coma scale scores of moderate head injury patients in the 7 day post-traumatic period

Chandrika Nayak, Dinesh Nayak, Annaswamy Raja, Anjali Rao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Epidemiologic works reveal that moderate head injury (MHI) is more frequent and a substantial number of these patients develop complications resulting in neurological disabilities. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a major role in post-traumatic neuronal damage following traumatic head injury. Thus, the current study analysed the post-traumatic changes in the erythrocyte markers of oxidative damage and the relationship between these parameters and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores of MHI patients during the 7 day study period. Methods: Peripheral venous blood samples were taken at the time of hospital admission (d1 of injury) and on d7 from 25 MHI patients (admission GCS score> 8). These were compared with samples from 25 healthy individuals (normal controls, NC). GCS scores were recorded at the same time points of the study period. Erythrocyte lipid peroxidation (LP) and thiol oxidation levels were estimated and compared with that of NC. The relationship between GCS scores and erythrocyte markers were also studied. Results: Erythrocyte thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels reflecting lipid peroxidative damage remained significantly elevated at both time points of the study period in MHI patients as compared to NC (p<0.001). There was a significant decrease in the level of non-protein thiols in MHI patients as compared to NC (p<0.01) at the same time points of the study. However, on d7 there were no further significant changes in the markers of oxidative damage in MHI patients as compared to on d1. Conclusion: These findings suggest that a condition of oxidative stress occurs during the entire post-traumatic period in MHI patients and the utility of markers of oxidative damage in the prognosis of head injury needs to be addressed in further works.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)461-464
Number of pages4
JournalNeurological Research
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-06-2008

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Glasgow Coma Scale
Craniocerebral Trauma
Sulfhydryl Compounds
Lipid Peroxidation
Erythrocytes
Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances
Patient Admission
Reactive Oxygen Species
Oxidative Stress
Lipids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Relationship between markers of lipid peroxidation, thiol oxidation and Glasgow coma scale scores of moderate head injury patients in the 7 day post-traumatic period",
abstract = "Objective: Epidemiologic works reveal that moderate head injury (MHI) is more frequent and a substantial number of these patients develop complications resulting in neurological disabilities. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a major role in post-traumatic neuronal damage following traumatic head injury. Thus, the current study analysed the post-traumatic changes in the erythrocyte markers of oxidative damage and the relationship between these parameters and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores of MHI patients during the 7 day study period. Methods: Peripheral venous blood samples were taken at the time of hospital admission (d1 of injury) and on d7 from 25 MHI patients (admission GCS score> 8). These were compared with samples from 25 healthy individuals (normal controls, NC). GCS scores were recorded at the same time points of the study period. Erythrocyte lipid peroxidation (LP) and thiol oxidation levels were estimated and compared with that of NC. The relationship between GCS scores and erythrocyte markers were also studied. Results: Erythrocyte thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels reflecting lipid peroxidative damage remained significantly elevated at both time points of the study period in MHI patients as compared to NC (p<0.001). There was a significant decrease in the level of non-protein thiols in MHI patients as compared to NC (p<0.01) at the same time points of the study. However, on d7 there were no further significant changes in the markers of oxidative damage in MHI patients as compared to on d1. Conclusion: These findings suggest that a condition of oxidative stress occurs during the entire post-traumatic period in MHI patients and the utility of markers of oxidative damage in the prognosis of head injury needs to be addressed in further works.",
author = "Chandrika Nayak and Dinesh Nayak and Annaswamy Raja and Anjali Rao",
year = "2008",
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T1 - Relationship between markers of lipid peroxidation, thiol oxidation and Glasgow coma scale scores of moderate head injury patients in the 7 day post-traumatic period

AU - Nayak, Chandrika

AU - Nayak, Dinesh

AU - Raja, Annaswamy

AU - Rao, Anjali

PY - 2008/6/1

Y1 - 2008/6/1

N2 - Objective: Epidemiologic works reveal that moderate head injury (MHI) is more frequent and a substantial number of these patients develop complications resulting in neurological disabilities. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a major role in post-traumatic neuronal damage following traumatic head injury. Thus, the current study analysed the post-traumatic changes in the erythrocyte markers of oxidative damage and the relationship between these parameters and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores of MHI patients during the 7 day study period. Methods: Peripheral venous blood samples were taken at the time of hospital admission (d1 of injury) and on d7 from 25 MHI patients (admission GCS score> 8). These were compared with samples from 25 healthy individuals (normal controls, NC). GCS scores were recorded at the same time points of the study period. Erythrocyte lipid peroxidation (LP) and thiol oxidation levels were estimated and compared with that of NC. The relationship between GCS scores and erythrocyte markers were also studied. Results: Erythrocyte thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels reflecting lipid peroxidative damage remained significantly elevated at both time points of the study period in MHI patients as compared to NC (p<0.001). There was a significant decrease in the level of non-protein thiols in MHI patients as compared to NC (p<0.01) at the same time points of the study. However, on d7 there were no further significant changes in the markers of oxidative damage in MHI patients as compared to on d1. Conclusion: These findings suggest that a condition of oxidative stress occurs during the entire post-traumatic period in MHI patients and the utility of markers of oxidative damage in the prognosis of head injury needs to be addressed in further works.

AB - Objective: Epidemiologic works reveal that moderate head injury (MHI) is more frequent and a substantial number of these patients develop complications resulting in neurological disabilities. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a major role in post-traumatic neuronal damage following traumatic head injury. Thus, the current study analysed the post-traumatic changes in the erythrocyte markers of oxidative damage and the relationship between these parameters and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores of MHI patients during the 7 day study period. Methods: Peripheral venous blood samples were taken at the time of hospital admission (d1 of injury) and on d7 from 25 MHI patients (admission GCS score> 8). These were compared with samples from 25 healthy individuals (normal controls, NC). GCS scores were recorded at the same time points of the study period. Erythrocyte lipid peroxidation (LP) and thiol oxidation levels were estimated and compared with that of NC. The relationship between GCS scores and erythrocyte markers were also studied. Results: Erythrocyte thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels reflecting lipid peroxidative damage remained significantly elevated at both time points of the study period in MHI patients as compared to NC (p<0.001). There was a significant decrease in the level of non-protein thiols in MHI patients as compared to NC (p<0.01) at the same time points of the study. However, on d7 there were no further significant changes in the markers of oxidative damage in MHI patients as compared to on d1. Conclusion: These findings suggest that a condition of oxidative stress occurs during the entire post-traumatic period in MHI patients and the utility of markers of oxidative damage in the prognosis of head injury needs to be addressed in further works.

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U2 - 10.1179/016164107X251790

DO - 10.1179/016164107X251790

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VL - 30

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EP - 464

JO - Neurological Research

JF - Neurological Research

SN - 0161-6412

IS - 5

ER -