Relationship between neurological outcome and early oxidative changes in erythrocytes in head injury patients

Chandrika Nayak, Dinesh Nayak, Surekha Bhat, Annaswamy Raja, Anjali Rao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Experimental data indicate that destructive oxidative events reach their peak within the first 24 h after trauma in head injury (HI) and that brain damage occurring due to this impact can be the cause of death or irreversible permanent disabilities in affected patients. Methods: Venous blood samples were obtained from 50 HI patients within 24 h of trauma onset and from 30 age- and sex-matched normal controls (NC). Patients were divided into three different neurological outcome groups: those who died within 10 days of trauma (D), and those with severe neurological deficits (SD) or mild/no neurological deficits (MD) at 90 days after trauma. Early oxidative changes in erythrocytes were assessed by estimating an indicator of lipid peroxidative damage - thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) - and antioxidants [reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity]. Results: In the D group, erythrocyte TBARS levels were significantly higher compared to the NC, SD and MD groups (p<0.001); GSH levels were significantly lower compared to the NC (p<0.001) and MD (p<0.01) groups and SOD activity was significantly higher than in the NC (p<0.01) and MD (p<0.01) groups. In the SD group, TBARS levels were significantly higher than in the NC (p<0.001) and MD (p<0.05) groups; GSH levels were significantly lower than in the NC (p<0.001) and MD (p<0.01) groups and SOD activity was higher compared to the NC and MD (p<0.01) groups. In the MD group, TBARS levels were significantly higher and GSH levels significantly lower compared to the NC group (p<0.001). However, we did not observe any significant change in SOD activity compared to the NC group. Conclusions: These findings indicate that early oxidative changes may reflect the severity of neurological insult and provide an early indication of patient outcome in traumatic HI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)629-633
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-05-2007

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Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances
Craniocerebral Trauma
Superoxide Dismutase
Erythrocytes
Wounds and Injuries
Control Groups
Age of Onset
Glutathione
Cause of Death
Antioxidants
Lipids
Brain
Blood

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

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title = "Relationship between neurological outcome and early oxidative changes in erythrocytes in head injury patients",
abstract = "Background: Experimental data indicate that destructive oxidative events reach their peak within the first 24 h after trauma in head injury (HI) and that brain damage occurring due to this impact can be the cause of death or irreversible permanent disabilities in affected patients. Methods: Venous blood samples were obtained from 50 HI patients within 24 h of trauma onset and from 30 age- and sex-matched normal controls (NC). Patients were divided into three different neurological outcome groups: those who died within 10 days of trauma (D), and those with severe neurological deficits (SD) or mild/no neurological deficits (MD) at 90 days after trauma. Early oxidative changes in erythrocytes were assessed by estimating an indicator of lipid peroxidative damage - thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) - and antioxidants [reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity]. Results: In the D group, erythrocyte TBARS levels were significantly higher compared to the NC, SD and MD groups (p<0.001); GSH levels were significantly lower compared to the NC (p<0.001) and MD (p<0.01) groups and SOD activity was significantly higher than in the NC (p<0.01) and MD (p<0.01) groups. In the SD group, TBARS levels were significantly higher than in the NC (p<0.001) and MD (p<0.05) groups; GSH levels were significantly lower than in the NC (p<0.001) and MD (p<0.01) groups and SOD activity was higher compared to the NC and MD (p<0.01) groups. In the MD group, TBARS levels were significantly higher and GSH levels significantly lower compared to the NC group (p<0.001). However, we did not observe any significant change in SOD activity compared to the NC group. Conclusions: These findings indicate that early oxidative changes may reflect the severity of neurological insult and provide an early indication of patient outcome in traumatic HI.",
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Relationship between neurological outcome and early oxidative changes in erythrocytes in head injury patients. / Nayak, Chandrika; Nayak, Dinesh; Bhat, Surekha; Raja, Annaswamy; Rao, Anjali.

In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Vol. 45, No. 5, 01.05.2007, p. 629-633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Relationship between neurological outcome and early oxidative changes in erythrocytes in head injury patients

AU - Nayak, Chandrika

AU - Nayak, Dinesh

AU - Bhat, Surekha

AU - Raja, Annaswamy

AU - Rao, Anjali

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N2 - Background: Experimental data indicate that destructive oxidative events reach their peak within the first 24 h after trauma in head injury (HI) and that brain damage occurring due to this impact can be the cause of death or irreversible permanent disabilities in affected patients. Methods: Venous blood samples were obtained from 50 HI patients within 24 h of trauma onset and from 30 age- and sex-matched normal controls (NC). Patients were divided into three different neurological outcome groups: those who died within 10 days of trauma (D), and those with severe neurological deficits (SD) or mild/no neurological deficits (MD) at 90 days after trauma. Early oxidative changes in erythrocytes were assessed by estimating an indicator of lipid peroxidative damage - thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) - and antioxidants [reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity]. Results: In the D group, erythrocyte TBARS levels were significantly higher compared to the NC, SD and MD groups (p<0.001); GSH levels were significantly lower compared to the NC (p<0.001) and MD (p<0.01) groups and SOD activity was significantly higher than in the NC (p<0.01) and MD (p<0.01) groups. In the SD group, TBARS levels were significantly higher than in the NC (p<0.001) and MD (p<0.05) groups; GSH levels were significantly lower than in the NC (p<0.001) and MD (p<0.01) groups and SOD activity was higher compared to the NC and MD (p<0.01) groups. In the MD group, TBARS levels were significantly higher and GSH levels significantly lower compared to the NC group (p<0.001). However, we did not observe any significant change in SOD activity compared to the NC group. Conclusions: These findings indicate that early oxidative changes may reflect the severity of neurological insult and provide an early indication of patient outcome in traumatic HI.

AB - Background: Experimental data indicate that destructive oxidative events reach their peak within the first 24 h after trauma in head injury (HI) and that brain damage occurring due to this impact can be the cause of death or irreversible permanent disabilities in affected patients. Methods: Venous blood samples were obtained from 50 HI patients within 24 h of trauma onset and from 30 age- and sex-matched normal controls (NC). Patients were divided into three different neurological outcome groups: those who died within 10 days of trauma (D), and those with severe neurological deficits (SD) or mild/no neurological deficits (MD) at 90 days after trauma. Early oxidative changes in erythrocytes were assessed by estimating an indicator of lipid peroxidative damage - thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) - and antioxidants [reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity]. Results: In the D group, erythrocyte TBARS levels were significantly higher compared to the NC, SD and MD groups (p<0.001); GSH levels were significantly lower compared to the NC (p<0.001) and MD (p<0.01) groups and SOD activity was significantly higher than in the NC (p<0.01) and MD (p<0.01) groups. In the SD group, TBARS levels were significantly higher than in the NC (p<0.001) and MD (p<0.05) groups; GSH levels were significantly lower than in the NC (p<0.001) and MD (p<0.01) groups and SOD activity was higher compared to the NC and MD (p<0.01) groups. In the MD group, TBARS levels were significantly higher and GSH levels significantly lower compared to the NC group (p<0.001). However, we did not observe any significant change in SOD activity compared to the NC group. Conclusions: These findings indicate that early oxidative changes may reflect the severity of neurological insult and provide an early indication of patient outcome in traumatic HI.

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