Relationship between pelvic alignment and weight-bearing asymmetry in community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors

Suruliraj Karthikbabu, Mahabala Chakrapani, Sailakshmi Ganesan, Ratnavalli Ellajosyula

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Altered pelvic alignment and asymmetrical weight bearing on lower extremities are the most common findings observed in standing and walking after stroke. The purpose of this study was to find the relationship between pelvic alignment and weight-bearing asymmetry (WBA) in community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in tertiary care rehabilitation centers. In standing, the lateral and anterior pelvic tilt angle of chronic stroke survivors was assessed using palpation (PALM™) meter device. The percentage of WBA was measured with two standard weighing scales. Pearson correlation coefficient (r) was used to study the correlation between pelvic tilt and WBA. Results: Of 112 study participants, the mean (standard deviation) age was 54.7 (11.7) years and the poststroke duration was 14 (11) months. The lateral pelvic tilt on the most affected side and bilateral anterior pelvic tilt were 2.47 (1.8) and 4.4 (1.8) degree, respectively. The percentage of WBA was 23.2 (18.94). There was a high correlation of lateral pelvic tilt with WBA (r = 0.631; P< 0.001) than anterior pelvic tilt (r = 0.44; P< 0.001). Conclusion: Excessive lateral pelvic tilt toward the most affected side in standing may influence the weight-bearing ability of the ipsilateral lower extremity in community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S37-S40
JournalJournal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-12-2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

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