Response to narrow-band UVB - Vitiligo-melasma versus vitiligo

A comparative study

Parikshit Sharma, Harsha S. Pai, Ganesh S. Pai, Maria Kuruvila, Reshma Kolar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Vitiligo is the most common depigmentary disorder of the skin and hair, resulting from selective destruction of melanocytes. Melasma, a hyperpigmentary disorder, presents as irregular, brown, macular hypermelanosis. A small subset of vitiligo patients paradoxically also have melasma. Objective: To evaluate and compare the response to narrow-band UVB in a group of patients with vitiligo, and another group of patients with vitiligo and coexisting melasma (vitiligo-melasma). Methods: Patients in both groups were treated with narrow-band UVB and a comparison of the zonal repigmentation was made at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the initiation of therapy. Results: At the end of 12 weeks, 86% of patients in the vitiligo-melasma group attained ≥75% pigmentation on the face, whereas this was achieved in only 12.5% of patients in the vitiligo group. Over the limbs, 73% of patients in the vitiligo-melasma group attained 75% or more pigmentation at the end of 12 weeks compared with only 9% in the vitiligo group. On the trunk, only 20% of vitiligo-melasma patients showed ≥75% pigmentation at 12 weeks compared with 63% of patients in the vitiligo group. Conclusion: Patients having both vitiligo and melasma have a significantly better prognosis for repigmentation on the face and limbs with narrow-band UVB compared with patients with vitiligo alone; the vitiligo-melasma patients achieve repigmentation much earlier and also attain a greater level of repigmentation. Unexpectedly, for truncal lesions, patients with vitiligo alone responded better than those with both conditions. Although the vitiligo-melasma group with truncal lesions started repigmenting earlier, the final pigmentation was more extensive in the vitiligo group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-132
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Dermatology
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 07-03-2011

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Melanosis
Vitiligo
Pigmentation
Extremities
Hyperpigmentation
Melanocytes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Sharma, Parikshit ; Pai, Harsha S. ; Pai, Ganesh S. ; Kuruvila, Maria ; Kolar, Reshma. / Response to narrow-band UVB - Vitiligo-melasma versus vitiligo : A comparative study. In: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology. 2011 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 127-132.
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abstract = "Background: Vitiligo is the most common depigmentary disorder of the skin and hair, resulting from selective destruction of melanocytes. Melasma, a hyperpigmentary disorder, presents as irregular, brown, macular hypermelanosis. A small subset of vitiligo patients paradoxically also have melasma. Objective: To evaluate and compare the response to narrow-band UVB in a group of patients with vitiligo, and another group of patients with vitiligo and coexisting melasma (vitiligo-melasma). Methods: Patients in both groups were treated with narrow-band UVB and a comparison of the zonal repigmentation was made at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the initiation of therapy. Results: At the end of 12 weeks, 86{\%} of patients in the vitiligo-melasma group attained ≥75{\%} pigmentation on the face, whereas this was achieved in only 12.5{\%} of patients in the vitiligo group. Over the limbs, 73{\%} of patients in the vitiligo-melasma group attained 75{\%} or more pigmentation at the end of 12 weeks compared with only 9{\%} in the vitiligo group. On the trunk, only 20{\%} of vitiligo-melasma patients showed ≥75{\%} pigmentation at 12 weeks compared with 63{\%} of patients in the vitiligo group. Conclusion: Patients having both vitiligo and melasma have a significantly better prognosis for repigmentation on the face and limbs with narrow-band UVB compared with patients with vitiligo alone; the vitiligo-melasma patients achieve repigmentation much earlier and also attain a greater level of repigmentation. Unexpectedly, for truncal lesions, patients with vitiligo alone responded better than those with both conditions. Although the vitiligo-melasma group with truncal lesions started repigmenting earlier, the final pigmentation was more extensive in the vitiligo group.",
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Response to narrow-band UVB - Vitiligo-melasma versus vitiligo : A comparative study. / Sharma, Parikshit; Pai, Harsha S.; Pai, Ganesh S.; Kuruvila, Maria; Kolar, Reshma.

In: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, Vol. 12, No. 2, 07.03.2011, p. 127-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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