Risk and triggering factors associated with bronchial asthma among school-going children in an urban city of coastal Karnataka

Sowmini P. Kamath, Shrividya Shrishakumar, Animesh Jain, Anand Ramakrishna, Shantharam B. Baliga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Asthma is common in childhood and is a major public health issue. The objectives of this study were to identify risk and triggering factors associated with asthma among school children. Material and Methods: A prospective cross sectional study was conducted among 6-15 years old children, over two months in two private schools at Mangalore city. Trigger factors were assessed as per asthma trigger inventory (ATI). Responses were graded from 0-5 score based on ‘never’,’ rarely’, ‘sometimes’, ‘most of the time’ and ‘always’. A predesigned questionnaire suiting the city environment was prepared and used to assess the risk and triggering factors. Analysis was done using SPSS version 16. Results: Asthma and allergic rhinitis in parents (34.1%,40.7%),smoking at home(24.2%), exclusive breast feeding absence (27.5%),early weaning(24.2%),living in a flat (37.4%) and pets at home(37.4%) were risk factors noted. As per ATI, it was found that ‘having a cold’ was the most frequently selected trigger at 94.5%(47.3% ‘sometimes’, 2.2% ‘always’), followed by ‘running’ at 79.1% (27.5% ‘sometimes’, 13.2% ‘always’), and ‘house dust’ at 69.2% (31.9% ‘sometimes’, 6.6% ‘always’). The highest mean was for infections, (2.228, SD=0.546), followed by physical exercise (2.167, SD=0.331). Animal allergens had lowest mean (1.527, SD=0.104), followed by psychological triggers at second lowest (1.579, SD=0.181). However none of the risk and trigger factors had statistical significance with asthma. Conclusion: Avoiding exposure to probable triggers and identifying risk factors would aid in planning effective strategic measures with better quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-66
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nepal Paediatric Society
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2017

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Asthma
Equipment and Supplies
Pets
Weaning
Breast Feeding
Dust
Running
Allergens
Public Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parents
Smoking
Quality of Life
Exercise
Psychology
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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title = "Risk and triggering factors associated with bronchial asthma among school-going children in an urban city of coastal Karnataka",
abstract = "Introduction: Asthma is common in childhood and is a major public health issue. The objectives of this study were to identify risk and triggering factors associated with asthma among school children. Material and Methods: A prospective cross sectional study was conducted among 6-15 years old children, over two months in two private schools at Mangalore city. Trigger factors were assessed as per asthma trigger inventory (ATI). Responses were graded from 0-5 score based on ‘never’,’ rarely’, ‘sometimes’, ‘most of the time’ and ‘always’. A predesigned questionnaire suiting the city environment was prepared and used to assess the risk and triggering factors. Analysis was done using SPSS version 16. Results: Asthma and allergic rhinitis in parents (34.1{\%},40.7{\%}),smoking at home(24.2{\%}), exclusive breast feeding absence (27.5{\%}),early weaning(24.2{\%}),living in a flat (37.4{\%}) and pets at home(37.4{\%}) were risk factors noted. As per ATI, it was found that ‘having a cold’ was the most frequently selected trigger at 94.5{\%}(47.3{\%} ‘sometimes’, 2.2{\%} ‘always’), followed by ‘running’ at 79.1{\%} (27.5{\%} ‘sometimes’, 13.2{\%} ‘always’), and ‘house dust’ at 69.2{\%} (31.9{\%} ‘sometimes’, 6.6{\%} ‘always’). The highest mean was for infections, (2.228, SD=0.546), followed by physical exercise (2.167, SD=0.331). Animal allergens had lowest mean (1.527, SD=0.104), followed by psychological triggers at second lowest (1.579, SD=0.181). However none of the risk and trigger factors had statistical significance with asthma. Conclusion: Avoiding exposure to probable triggers and identifying risk factors would aid in planning effective strategic measures with better quality of life.",
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Risk and triggering factors associated with bronchial asthma among school-going children in an urban city of coastal Karnataka. / Kamath, Sowmini P.; Shrishakumar, Shrividya; Jain, Animesh; Ramakrishna, Anand; Baliga, Shantharam B.

In: Journal of Nepal Paediatric Society, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 59-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Introduction: Asthma is common in childhood and is a major public health issue. The objectives of this study were to identify risk and triggering factors associated with asthma among school children. Material and Methods: A prospective cross sectional study was conducted among 6-15 years old children, over two months in two private schools at Mangalore city. Trigger factors were assessed as per asthma trigger inventory (ATI). Responses were graded from 0-5 score based on ‘never’,’ rarely’, ‘sometimes’, ‘most of the time’ and ‘always’. A predesigned questionnaire suiting the city environment was prepared and used to assess the risk and triggering factors. Analysis was done using SPSS version 16. Results: Asthma and allergic rhinitis in parents (34.1%,40.7%),smoking at home(24.2%), exclusive breast feeding absence (27.5%),early weaning(24.2%),living in a flat (37.4%) and pets at home(37.4%) were risk factors noted. As per ATI, it was found that ‘having a cold’ was the most frequently selected trigger at 94.5%(47.3% ‘sometimes’, 2.2% ‘always’), followed by ‘running’ at 79.1% (27.5% ‘sometimes’, 13.2% ‘always’), and ‘house dust’ at 69.2% (31.9% ‘sometimes’, 6.6% ‘always’). The highest mean was for infections, (2.228, SD=0.546), followed by physical exercise (2.167, SD=0.331). Animal allergens had lowest mean (1.527, SD=0.104), followed by psychological triggers at second lowest (1.579, SD=0.181). However none of the risk and trigger factors had statistical significance with asthma. Conclusion: Avoiding exposure to probable triggers and identifying risk factors would aid in planning effective strategic measures with better quality of life.

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