Role of Early Referral and Surgical Intervention in Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy: Awareness Among Obstetricians and Pediatricians in a Teaching Hospital

A. Nayak, A. D’Souza, Anil K. Bhat, Arati Rao, Ashwath M. Acharya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A cross-sectional study was conducted using a validated and standardized questionnaire answered by willing pediatricians and obstetricians at our university teaching hospitals. Nearly two thirds of the pediatricians (62.8%) and three fourths of the obstetricians (73.6%) continued to accept the terminology of obstetric brachial plexus birth palsy which is a misnomer; 32.6% of pediatricians felt that they were unaware of the current trends in its management. Parental reluctance (23.5%) and inadequate knowledge in current approaches among surgeons and pediatricians (41.2%) were suggested as chief causes for the delay in their adequate referral and management using surgical exploration, nerve grafting, and nerve transfer. The delayed presentations of birth brachial plexus injuries with missed opportunity for optimum treatment can be partly attributed to inadequate information available on definitive guidelines in its management among the stakeholders including parents, primary care physicians, and surgeons.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Quarterly of Community Health Education
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 01-01-2019

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Brachial Plexus
Teaching Hospitals
Paralysis
Referral and Consultation
Parturition
Teaching
management
Arm Injuries
university teaching
obstetrics
Birth Injuries
Nerve Transfer
available information
cross-sectional study
technical language
Primary Care Physicians
parents
stakeholder
physician
Terminology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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abstract = "A cross-sectional study was conducted using a validated and standardized questionnaire answered by willing pediatricians and obstetricians at our university teaching hospitals. Nearly two thirds of the pediatricians (62.8{\%}) and three fourths of the obstetricians (73.6{\%}) continued to accept the terminology of obstetric brachial plexus birth palsy which is a misnomer; 32.6{\%} of pediatricians felt that they were unaware of the current trends in its management. Parental reluctance (23.5{\%}) and inadequate knowledge in current approaches among surgeons and pediatricians (41.2{\%}) were suggested as chief causes for the delay in their adequate referral and management using surgical exploration, nerve grafting, and nerve transfer. The delayed presentations of birth brachial plexus injuries with missed opportunity for optimum treatment can be partly attributed to inadequate information available on definitive guidelines in its management among the stakeholders including parents, primary care physicians, and surgeons.",
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