Selenium attenuates venlafaxine hydrochloride-induced testicular damage in mice via modulating oxidative stress and apoptosis

Sarvnarinder Kaur, Amarjit Kaur, Nisha Jaswal, Aniqa Aniqa, Shilpa Sadwal, Sanjay Bharati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present study assessed the effect of selenium (Se) supplementation on Venlafaxine hydrochloride (VH)-induced testicular toxicity. Mice were segregated into Group I (C), Group II (0.5 ppm Se), Group III (VH at a dose 60 mg/kg b.w.) and Group IV (Se was given as per Group II, and VH was given as per Group III). After 10 weeks, sperm parameters, histology, sperm cell counts, antioxidants activities, apoptotic proteins and molecular analysis of testicular tissue were evaluated. Group III had significantly lower sperm concentration (from 2.17 ± 0.28 to 1.04 ± 0.22) and sperm motility (from 68.04 ± 5.5 to 21.47 ± 5.21), and showed an extensive vacuolisation in the germinal epithelium, abnormal basement membrane, and reduced germ cell number as compared to Group I. However, selenium supplementation in Group IV substantially increased sperm concentration (1.47 ± 0.48) and motility (33.27 ± 8.66), improved the histoarchitecture and repopulated the germ cells as observed by raised numbers of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, round spermatids and elongated spermatids contrasted to Group III. Group IV also showed a noteworthy decreased ROS, LPO levels, as well as expressions of Bax, caspase-9, and caspase-3 and increased the SOD, CAT, GPx, and GSH activities as well the expression of Bcl-2 as compared to Group III. This effect was further supported by FTIR analysis for nucleic acids. Thus, selenium supplementation showed significant protection against VH-induced testicular toxicity.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAndrologia
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology
  • Urology

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