Several fungi from fire-prone forests of southern India can utilize furaldehydes

M. B Govinda Rajulu, Lien B. Lai, T. S. Murali, Venkat Gopalan, T. S. Suryanarayanan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), released during thermo-chemical degradation of lignocellulosic biomass, inhibit microbial fermentation of sugars to biofuels. One approach to circumvent this roadblock is through microbial degradation of furaldehydes in biomass hydrolysates. Since these furaldehydes are the most common and abundant volatile organic compounds in plant litter and are released during biomass burning, we investigated endophytic and litter fungi of fire-prone forests for their ability to utilize furaldehydes. Of the 23 (11 endophytic and 12 litter) fungi we tested, 10 grew on furfural, 21 on HMF, and nine on both substrates as the sole carbon source. These fungi initially grew slower on furaldehydes than on sucrose, but their growth increased on subsequent sub-culturing on the same furaldehyde medium, suggesting an innate-adaptation competence. The ability of endophytic and litter fungi of fire-prone forests to metabolize furaldehydes is more common than previously anticipated and helps rationalize their unusual ecological fitness in specific niches. Our findings should also motivate a closer examination of all locales of biomass (including crop residue) burning for identifying furaldehyde-utilizing fungi.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1049-1056
Number of pages8
JournalMycological Progress
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23-10-2014

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Furaldehyde
forest fires
forest fire
India
Fungi
fungus
litter
fungi
furfural
hydroxymethylfurfural
Biomass
biomass
Aptitude
chemical degradation
volatile organic compounds
energy crops
crop residue
biomass burning
crop residues
hydrolysates

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Rajulu, M. B Govinda ; Lai, Lien B. ; Murali, T. S. ; Gopalan, Venkat ; Suryanarayanan, T. S. / Several fungi from fire-prone forests of southern India can utilize furaldehydes. In: Mycological Progress. 2014 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 1049-1056.
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Several fungi from fire-prone forests of southern India can utilize furaldehydes. / Rajulu, M. B Govinda; Lai, Lien B.; Murali, T. S.; Gopalan, Venkat; Suryanarayanan, T. S.

In: Mycological Progress, Vol. 13, No. 4, 23.10.2014, p. 1049-1056.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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