Severe haemolytic disease of a newborn with variant D mimicking blocked-D phenomenon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Anti-D is still the most common antibody causing severe haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). In a mother with a very high titer of anti-D, antibodies can coat and block the D antigens on the red blood cells of the newborn. This blocking phenomenon prevents agglutination of the D-positive red cells with the IgM anti-D typing reagent, giving false negative results. Here, we report the case of a newborn with variant D phenotype and severe HDFN, which mimicked the blocked-D phenomenon, which, at the first instance, confused both the treating clinicians and the transfusion service personnel.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBMJ Case Reports
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15-12-2019

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Fetal Erythroblastosis
Fetus
Agglutination
Immunoglobulin M
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Erythrocytes
Phenotype
Antigens
Antibodies
RHO(D) antibody

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Anti-D is still the most common antibody causing severe haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). In a mother with a very high titer of anti-D, antibodies can coat and block the D antigens on the red blood cells of the newborn. This blocking phenomenon prevents agglutination of the D-positive red cells with the IgM anti-D typing reagent, giving false negative results. Here, we report the case of a newborn with variant D phenotype and severe HDFN, which mimicked the blocked-D phenomenon, which, at the first instance, confused both the treating clinicians and the transfusion service personnel.",
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Severe haemolytic disease of a newborn with variant D mimicking blocked-D phenomenon. / Das, Soumya; Shastry, Shamee; Baliga, Poornima B.

In: BMJ Case Reports, Vol. 12, No. 12, 15.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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