Silver nanoparticles shoot up from the root of Daucus carrota (L.)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extensive work has been done to explore the potential promises of plant systems in the synthesis of metal nanoparticles. Herein, a convenient and rapid process for the formation of silver nanoparticles with natural reducing and capping agents of Daucus carrota (L.) is reported. The synchronization of secondary metabolites and enzymes as reducing/capping agents plays a vital role in the synthesis and stability of silver nanoparticles for approximately two months. Stable silver nanoparticleswere formed by reacting tap root extract of D. carrota with an aqueous solution of AgNO3, which reduced Ag++ to Ag0. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were further characterized using UV spectrophotometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDAX), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) methods. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were spherical and stable in aqueous medium ranges from 31-52 nm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-61
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Green Nanotechnology: Biomedicine
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Silver
Nanoparticles
Reducing Agents
Metal Nanoparticles
X-Ray Emission Spectrometry
Metal nanoparticles
Spectrophotometry
Reducing agents
Metabolites
X-Ray Diffraction
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Energy dispersive spectroscopy
Synchronization
Enzymes
X ray diffraction
Scanning electron microscopy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

@article{f85f5e9a1cd943528e9e0b998d210dda,
title = "Silver nanoparticles shoot up from the root of Daucus carrota (L.)",
abstract = "Extensive work has been done to explore the potential promises of plant systems in the synthesis of metal nanoparticles. Herein, a convenient and rapid process for the formation of silver nanoparticles with natural reducing and capping agents of Daucus carrota (L.) is reported. The synchronization of secondary metabolites and enzymes as reducing/capping agents plays a vital role in the synthesis and stability of silver nanoparticles for approximately two months. Stable silver nanoparticleswere formed by reacting tap root extract of D. carrota with an aqueous solution of AgNO3, which reduced Ag++ to Ag0. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were further characterized using UV spectrophotometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDAX), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) methods. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were spherical and stable in aqueous medium ranges from 31-52 nm.",
author = "Mukunthan, {K. S.} and S. Balaji",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1080/19430892.2012.654745",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "54--61",
journal = "International Journal of Green Nanotechnology: Physics and Chemistry",
issn = "1943-085X",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Silver nanoparticles shoot up from the root of Daucus carrota (L.)

AU - Mukunthan, K. S.

AU - Balaji, S.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Extensive work has been done to explore the potential promises of plant systems in the synthesis of metal nanoparticles. Herein, a convenient and rapid process for the formation of silver nanoparticles with natural reducing and capping agents of Daucus carrota (L.) is reported. The synchronization of secondary metabolites and enzymes as reducing/capping agents plays a vital role in the synthesis and stability of silver nanoparticles for approximately two months. Stable silver nanoparticleswere formed by reacting tap root extract of D. carrota with an aqueous solution of AgNO3, which reduced Ag++ to Ag0. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were further characterized using UV spectrophotometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDAX), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) methods. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were spherical and stable in aqueous medium ranges from 31-52 nm.

AB - Extensive work has been done to explore the potential promises of plant systems in the synthesis of metal nanoparticles. Herein, a convenient and rapid process for the formation of silver nanoparticles with natural reducing and capping agents of Daucus carrota (L.) is reported. The synchronization of secondary metabolites and enzymes as reducing/capping agents plays a vital role in the synthesis and stability of silver nanoparticles for approximately two months. Stable silver nanoparticleswere formed by reacting tap root extract of D. carrota with an aqueous solution of AgNO3, which reduced Ag++ to Ag0. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were further characterized using UV spectrophotometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDAX), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) methods. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were spherical and stable in aqueous medium ranges from 31-52 nm.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84875974992&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84875974992&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/19430892.2012.654745

DO - 10.1080/19430892.2012.654745

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 54

EP - 61

JO - International Journal of Green Nanotechnology: Physics and Chemistry

JF - International Journal of Green Nanotechnology: Physics and Chemistry

SN - 1943-085X

IS - 1

ER -