Snuff-induced malignancy of the nasal vestibule: a case report

Suja Sreedharan, Mahesh Chandra Hegde, Radha Pai, Shobha Rhodrigues, Rajeev Kumar, Anwar Rasheed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The association between nasal snuff and malignancy is not well established. There is epidemiological evidence suggesting that oral tobacco when mixed with lime and betel leaves causes oral cancer in the Indian subcontinent. Similarly, snuff spiced with dried aloe has been reported to cause upper jaw malignancies in the Bantu tribes. The last reported case of nasal snuff causing cancer of the nose was described by John Hill in 1761. We describe here a case of a 69-year-old woman who developed a nasal vestibular malignancy after 30 years of snuff usage, and this, we believe, is the only reported case of nasal snuff causing cancer in the last 2 centuries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-356
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-09-2007

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Smokeless Tobacco
Nose
Neoplasms
Nose Neoplasms
Aloe
Mouth Neoplasms
Maxilla
Population Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Sreedharan, Suja ; Hegde, Mahesh Chandra ; Pai, Radha ; Rhodrigues, Shobha ; Kumar, Rajeev ; Rasheed, Anwar. / Snuff-induced malignancy of the nasal vestibule : a case report. In: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery. 2007 ; Vol. 28, No. 5. pp. 353-356.
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Snuff-induced malignancy of the nasal vestibule : a case report. / Sreedharan, Suja; Hegde, Mahesh Chandra; Pai, Radha; Rhodrigues, Shobha; Kumar, Rajeev; Rasheed, Anwar.

In: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 28, No. 5, 01.09.2007, p. 353-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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