Targeting of tumors on the pathophysiological principles and physicochemical aspects of delivery systems

P. Shivanand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A solid tumor comprises two major cellular components: the tumor parenchyma and the stroma; the latter incorporating the vasculature and other supporting cells. As the tumor grows, in order to meet the metabolic requirements of an expanding population of tumor cells, the pre-existing blood vessels become subject to intense angiogenic pressure. Several factors produced by tumor cells and infiltrating immune-competent effector cells in the tumor parenchyma are believed to signal the development of new capillaries from the pre-existing vessels by capillary sprouting and/or dysregulated intussusceptive microvascular growth. Further, in many solid tumors, endothelial cells destined to create new vessels are recruited not only from nearby vessels, but also to a significant extent from precursor cells within the bone marrow (so-called endothelial progenitor cells), a process referred to as "vasculogenesis".
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)765-770
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of PharmTech Research
Volume2
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Neoplasms
Bone Marrow Cells
Blood Vessels
Endothelial Cells
Pressure
Growth
Population

Cite this

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title = "Targeting of tumors on the pathophysiological principles and physicochemical aspects of delivery systems",
abstract = "A solid tumor comprises two major cellular components: the tumor parenchyma and the stroma; the latter incorporating the vasculature and other supporting cells. As the tumor grows, in order to meet the metabolic requirements of an expanding population of tumor cells, the pre-existing blood vessels become subject to intense angiogenic pressure. Several factors produced by tumor cells and infiltrating immune-competent effector cells in the tumor parenchyma are believed to signal the development of new capillaries from the pre-existing vessels by capillary sprouting and/or dysregulated intussusceptive microvascular growth. Further, in many solid tumors, endothelial cells destined to create new vessels are recruited not only from nearby vessels, but also to a significant extent from precursor cells within the bone marrow (so-called endothelial progenitor cells), a process referred to as {"}vasculogenesis{"}.",
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note = "Export Date: 10 November 2017 Correspondence Address: Shivanand, P.; MCOPS, Manipal University, Manipal, Udupi Karnataka, India; email: dot.shivanand@gmail.com Chemicals/CAS: camptothecin, 7689-03-4; cisplatin, 15663-27-1, 26035-31-4, 96081-74-2; cyclosporin, 79217-60-0; doxorubicin, 23214-92-8, 25316-40-9; folic acid, 59-30-3, 6484-89-5; paclitaxel, 33069-62-4; poloxamer, 9003-11-6; zinostatin maleic acid styrene copolymer, 123760-07-6 Tradenames: abraxane, Abraxis; myocet Manufacturers: Abraxis References: Munn, L.L., (2003) Aberrant vascular architecture in tumors and its importance in drug-based therapies, Drug Discov, 8, p. 396. , Today; Lyden, D., Impaired recruitment of bone-marrow-derived endothelial and haematopoietic precursor cells blocks, tumor angiogenesis, and growth (2001) Nat. Med, 7, p. 1194; Jain, R.K., Delivery of molecular medicine to solid tumors: Lessons from in vivo imaging of gene expression and function (2001) J. Control. Release, 74, p. 7; Dvorak, H.F., Identification and characterization of the blood vessels of solid tumors that are leaky to circulating macromolecules (1988) Am. J. Pathol, 133, p. 95; Hashizume, H., Openings between defective endothelial cells explain tumor vessel leakiness (2000) Am. J. Pathol, 156, p. 1363; Fukumura, D., Effect of host microenvironment on the microcirculation of human colon adenocarcinoma (1997) Am. J. Pathol, 151, p. 679; Daldrup, H., Correlation of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging with histologic tumor grade: Comparison of macromolecular and small-molecular contrast media (1998) Am. J. Roentgenol, 171, p. 941; Moghimi, S.M., Hunter, A.C., Murray, J.C., Long-circulating and target-specific nanoparticles. Theory to practice (2001) Pharmacol. Rev, 53, p. 283; Pluen, A., Role of tumor-host interactions in interstitial diffusion of macromolecules: Cranial vs. subcutaneous tumors (2001) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 98, p. 4628; Torchilin, V.P., Recent advances with liposomes as pharmaceutical carriers (2005) Nat. Rev. Drug Discov, 4, p. 145; Daemen, T., Liposomal doxorubicin-induced toxicity: Depletion and impairment of phagocytic activity of liver macrophages (1995) Int. J. Cancer, 61, p. 716; Batist, G., Reduced cardiotoxicity and preserved antitumor efficacy of liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide compared with conventional doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide in a randomized, multicenter trial of metastatic breast cancer (2001) J. Clin. Oncol, 19, p. 1444; Williams, G., Cortazar, P., Pazdur, R., Developing drugs to decrease the toxicity of chemotherapy (2003) J. Clin. Oncol, 19, p. 3439; Moghimi, S.M., Hunter, A.C., Murray, J.C., Nanomedicine: Current status and future prospects (2005) FASEB J, 19, p. 311; Gabizon, A., Shmeeda, H., Barenholz, Y., Pharmacokinetics of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin: Review of animal and human studies (2003) Clin. Pharmacokinet, 42, p. 419; Yuan, F., Microvascular permeability and interstitial penetration of sterically stabilized (stealth) liposomes in a human tumor xenograft (1999) Cancer Res, 54, p. 3352; Bandak, S., Pharmacological studies of cisplatin encapsulated in long-circulating liposomes in mouse tumor models (1999) Anti-Cancer Drugs, 10, p. 911; Huang, S. K. et al. Liposomes and hyperthermia in mice: Increased tumor uptake and therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in sterically stabilized liposomes. Cancer Res1998, 54, 2186; Allen, T.M., Ligand-targeted therapeutics in anticancer therapy (2002) Nat. Rev. Cancer, 2, p. 750; Pasqualini, R., Arap, W., McDonald, D.M., Probing the structural and molecular diversity of tumor vasculature (2002) Trend Mol. Med, 8, p. 563; Bartels, C.L., Wilson, A.F., How does a novel formulation of paclitaxel affect drug delivery in metastatic breast cancer? (2004) US Pharm, 29, pp. HS18; Garber, K., Improved paclitaxel formulation hints at new chemotherapy approach (2009) J. Natl Cancer Inst, 96, p. 90; Brigger, I., Dubernet, C., Couvreur, P., Nanoparticles in cancer therapy and diagnosis (2007) Adv. Drug Deliv. Rev, 54, p. 631; Colin de Verdiere, A., Reversion of multidrug resistance with olyalkylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles: Towards a mechanism of action (1999) Br. J. Cancer, 76, p. 198; Soma, C.E., Reversion of multidrug resistance by co-encapsulation of doxorubicin and cyclosporine A in polyalkylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles (2004) Biomaterials, 21, p. 1; Stella, B., Design of folic acid-conjugated nanoparticles for drug targeting (2006) J. Pharm. Sci, 89, p. 1452; Ferrari, M., Cancer nanotechnology: Opportunities and challenges (2005) Nat. Rev. Cancer, 5, p. 161; Perez, J.M., Josephson, L., Weissleder, R., Use of magnetic nanoparticles as nanosensors to probe for molecular interactions (2004) Chem. Bio. Chem, 2004, 5, p. 261; Moghimi, S.M., Bonnemain, B., Subcutaneous and intravenous delivery of diagnostic agents to the lymphatic system: Applications in lymphoscintigraphy and indirect lymphography (1999) Adv. Drug Deliv. Rev, 37, p. 295; Medintz, I.L., Quantum dot bioconjugates for imaging, labelling, and sensing (2007) Nat. Mater, 4, p. 435; Alivisatos, P., The use of nanocrystals in biological detection (2003) Nat. Biotechnol, 22, p. 47; Stroh, M., Quantum dots spectrally distinguish multiple species within the tumor milieu in vivo (2005) Nat. Med, 11, p. 678; Wu, X., Immunofluorescent labeling of cancer marker Her2 and other cellular targets with semiconductor quantum dots (2003) Nat. Biotechnol, 2003, 21, p. 41; Gao, X., In vivo cancer targeting and imaging with semiconductor quantum dots (2004) Nat. Biotechnol, 22, p. 969; Hirsch, L.R., Nanoshell-mediated nearinfrared thermal therapy of tumors under magnetic resonance guidance (2003) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 100, p. 13549; Duncan, R., The dawning era of polymer therapeutics (2004) Nat. Rev. Drug Discov, 2, p. 347; Oh, K.T., Bronich, T.K., Kabanov, A.V., Micellar formulations for drug delivery based on mixtures of hydrophobic and hydrophilic Pluronicw block copolymers (2004) J. Control. Release, 94, p. 411; Adams, M.L., Lavasanifar, A., Kwon, G.S., Amphiphilic block copolymers for drug delivery (2004) J. Pharm. Sci, 92, p. 1343; Haag, R., Supramolecular drug-delivery systems based on polymeric core-shell architectures (2004) Angew. Chem. Int. Ed, 2004, 43, p. 278; Kosterink, J. G. W. et al. Strategies for specific drug targeting to tumor cells. 12 of Drug Targeting, Organ-Specific Strategies, Molema, G., and Meijer, D. K. F., Eds., Wiley-VCH, Weinheim pp.199-232, 2001, chapter 8UR - https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-77953383885&partnerID=40&md5=7d7f13d93b57e8f9be1419b5637f7538",
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volume = "2",
pages = "765--770",
journal = "International Journal of PharmTech Research",
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}

Targeting of tumors on the pathophysiological principles and physicochemical aspects of delivery systems. / Shivanand, P.

In: International Journal of PharmTech Research, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2010, p. 765-770.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Targeting of tumors on the pathophysiological principles and physicochemical aspects of delivery systems

AU - Shivanand, P.

N1 - Export Date: 10 November 2017 Correspondence Address: Shivanand, P.; MCOPS, Manipal University, Manipal, Udupi Karnataka, India; email: dot.shivanand@gmail.com Chemicals/CAS: camptothecin, 7689-03-4; cisplatin, 15663-27-1, 26035-31-4, 96081-74-2; cyclosporin, 79217-60-0; doxorubicin, 23214-92-8, 25316-40-9; folic acid, 59-30-3, 6484-89-5; paclitaxel, 33069-62-4; poloxamer, 9003-11-6; zinostatin maleic acid styrene copolymer, 123760-07-6 Tradenames: abraxane, Abraxis; myocet Manufacturers: Abraxis References: Munn, L.L., (2003) Aberrant vascular architecture in tumors and its importance in drug-based therapies, Drug Discov, 8, p. 396. , Today; Lyden, D., Impaired recruitment of bone-marrow-derived endothelial and haematopoietic precursor cells blocks, tumor angiogenesis, and growth (2001) Nat. Med, 7, p. 1194; Jain, R.K., Delivery of molecular medicine to solid tumors: Lessons from in vivo imaging of gene expression and function (2001) J. Control. Release, 74, p. 7; Dvorak, H.F., Identification and characterization of the blood vessels of solid tumors that are leaky to circulating macromolecules (1988) Am. J. Pathol, 133, p. 95; Hashizume, H., Openings between defective endothelial cells explain tumor vessel leakiness (2000) Am. J. Pathol, 156, p. 1363; Fukumura, D., Effect of host microenvironment on the microcirculation of human colon adenocarcinoma (1997) Am. J. Pathol, 151, p. 679; Daldrup, H., Correlation of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging with histologic tumor grade: Comparison of macromolecular and small-molecular contrast media (1998) Am. J. Roentgenol, 171, p. 941; Moghimi, S.M., Hunter, A.C., Murray, J.C., Long-circulating and target-specific nanoparticles. Theory to practice (2001) Pharmacol. Rev, 53, p. 283; Pluen, A., Role of tumor-host interactions in interstitial diffusion of macromolecules: Cranial vs. subcutaneous tumors (2001) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 98, p. 4628; Torchilin, V.P., Recent advances with liposomes as pharmaceutical carriers (2005) Nat. Rev. Drug Discov, 4, p. 145; Daemen, T., Liposomal doxorubicin-induced toxicity: Depletion and impairment of phagocytic activity of liver macrophages (1995) Int. J. Cancer, 61, p. 716; Batist, G., Reduced cardiotoxicity and preserved antitumor efficacy of liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide compared with conventional doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide in a randomized, multicenter trial of metastatic breast cancer (2001) J. Clin. Oncol, 19, p. 1444; Williams, G., Cortazar, P., Pazdur, R., Developing drugs to decrease the toxicity of chemotherapy (2003) J. Clin. Oncol, 19, p. 3439; Moghimi, S.M., Hunter, A.C., Murray, J.C., Nanomedicine: Current status and future prospects (2005) FASEB J, 19, p. 311; Gabizon, A., Shmeeda, H., Barenholz, Y., Pharmacokinetics of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin: Review of animal and human studies (2003) Clin. Pharmacokinet, 42, p. 419; Yuan, F., Microvascular permeability and interstitial penetration of sterically stabilized (stealth) liposomes in a human tumor xenograft (1999) Cancer Res, 54, p. 3352; Bandak, S., Pharmacological studies of cisplatin encapsulated in long-circulating liposomes in mouse tumor models (1999) Anti-Cancer Drugs, 10, p. 911; Huang, S. K. et al. Liposomes and hyperthermia in mice: Increased tumor uptake and therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in sterically stabilized liposomes. Cancer Res1998, 54, 2186; Allen, T.M., Ligand-targeted therapeutics in anticancer therapy (2002) Nat. Rev. Cancer, 2, p. 750; Pasqualini, R., Arap, W., McDonald, D.M., Probing the structural and molecular diversity of tumor vasculature (2002) Trend Mol. Med, 8, p. 563; Bartels, C.L., Wilson, A.F., How does a novel formulation of paclitaxel affect drug delivery in metastatic breast cancer? (2004) US Pharm, 29, pp. HS18; Garber, K., Improved paclitaxel formulation hints at new chemotherapy approach (2009) J. Natl Cancer Inst, 96, p. 90; Brigger, I., Dubernet, C., Couvreur, P., Nanoparticles in cancer therapy and diagnosis (2007) Adv. Drug Deliv. Rev, 54, p. 631; Colin de Verdiere, A., Reversion of multidrug resistance with olyalkylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles: Towards a mechanism of action (1999) Br. J. Cancer, 76, p. 198; Soma, C.E., Reversion of multidrug resistance by co-encapsulation of doxorubicin and cyclosporine A in polyalkylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles (2004) Biomaterials, 21, p. 1; Stella, B., Design of folic acid-conjugated nanoparticles for drug targeting (2006) J. Pharm. Sci, 89, p. 1452; Ferrari, M., Cancer nanotechnology: Opportunities and challenges (2005) Nat. Rev. Cancer, 5, p. 161; Perez, J.M., Josephson, L., Weissleder, R., Use of magnetic nanoparticles as nanosensors to probe for molecular interactions (2004) Chem. Bio. Chem, 2004, 5, p. 261; Moghimi, S.M., Bonnemain, B., Subcutaneous and intravenous delivery of diagnostic agents to the lymphatic system: Applications in lymphoscintigraphy and indirect lymphography (1999) Adv. Drug Deliv. Rev, 37, p. 295; Medintz, I.L., Quantum dot bioconjugates for imaging, labelling, and sensing (2007) Nat. Mater, 4, p. 435; Alivisatos, P., The use of nanocrystals in biological detection (2003) Nat. Biotechnol, 22, p. 47; Stroh, M., Quantum dots spectrally distinguish multiple species within the tumor milieu in vivo (2005) Nat. Med, 11, p. 678; Wu, X., Immunofluorescent labeling of cancer marker Her2 and other cellular targets with semiconductor quantum dots (2003) Nat. Biotechnol, 2003, 21, p. 41; Gao, X., In vivo cancer targeting and imaging with semiconductor quantum dots (2004) Nat. Biotechnol, 22, p. 969; Hirsch, L.R., Nanoshell-mediated nearinfrared thermal therapy of tumors under magnetic resonance guidance (2003) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 100, p. 13549; Duncan, R., The dawning era of polymer therapeutics (2004) Nat. Rev. Drug Discov, 2, p. 347; Oh, K.T., Bronich, T.K., Kabanov, A.V., Micellar formulations for drug delivery based on mixtures of hydrophobic and hydrophilic Pluronicw block copolymers (2004) J. Control. Release, 94, p. 411; Adams, M.L., Lavasanifar, A., Kwon, G.S., Amphiphilic block copolymers for drug delivery (2004) J. Pharm. Sci, 92, p. 1343; Haag, R., Supramolecular drug-delivery systems based on polymeric core-shell architectures (2004) Angew. Chem. Int. Ed, 2004, 43, p. 278; Kosterink, J. G. W. et al. Strategies for specific drug targeting to tumor cells. 12 of Drug Targeting, Organ-Specific Strategies, Molema, G., and Meijer, D. K. F., Eds., Wiley-VCH, Weinheim pp.199-232, 2001, chapter 8UR - https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-77953383885&partnerID=40&md5=7d7f13d93b57e8f9be1419b5637f7538

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - A solid tumor comprises two major cellular components: the tumor parenchyma and the stroma; the latter incorporating the vasculature and other supporting cells. As the tumor grows, in order to meet the metabolic requirements of an expanding population of tumor cells, the pre-existing blood vessels become subject to intense angiogenic pressure. Several factors produced by tumor cells and infiltrating immune-competent effector cells in the tumor parenchyma are believed to signal the development of new capillaries from the pre-existing vessels by capillary sprouting and/or dysregulated intussusceptive microvascular growth. Further, in many solid tumors, endothelial cells destined to create new vessels are recruited not only from nearby vessels, but also to a significant extent from precursor cells within the bone marrow (so-called endothelial progenitor cells), a process referred to as "vasculogenesis".

AB - A solid tumor comprises two major cellular components: the tumor parenchyma and the stroma; the latter incorporating the vasculature and other supporting cells. As the tumor grows, in order to meet the metabolic requirements of an expanding population of tumor cells, the pre-existing blood vessels become subject to intense angiogenic pressure. Several factors produced by tumor cells and infiltrating immune-competent effector cells in the tumor parenchyma are believed to signal the development of new capillaries from the pre-existing vessels by capillary sprouting and/or dysregulated intussusceptive microvascular growth. Further, in many solid tumors, endothelial cells destined to create new vessels are recruited not only from nearby vessels, but also to a significant extent from precursor cells within the bone marrow (so-called endothelial progenitor cells), a process referred to as "vasculogenesis".

M3 - Article

VL - 2

SP - 765

EP - 770

JO - International Journal of PharmTech Research

JF - International Journal of PharmTech Research

SN - 0974-4304

IS - 1

ER -