The clinical and biochemical profiles of patients with IFG

Zohaib Abdul Wadood Khan, Sudha Vidyasagar, Dantuluru Muralidhar Varma, B. Nandakrishna, Avinash Holla, Binu V.S

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To study the clinical and biochemical profiles across the different ranges of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) based on American Diabetes Association (ADA) and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 149 subjects, of which 63 belonged to group 1 (IFG = 100–110 mg/dl) and 86 to group 2 (IFG = 111–125 mg/dl). Basic anthropometric and clinical examinations were done for all subjects. Data was collected from patient by a questionnaire, which included the history of hypertension and diabetes and other comorbidities and complications. Biochemical profiles including Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG), Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT), HbA1c, Fasting insulin levels and Fasting Lipid Profile were measured. Assessment of insulin resistance and beta cell function was done by Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA). Data were analysed using SPSS software version 15 and p < 0.05 considered as statistically significant. Family history of diabetes, prevalence of hypertension and higher BMI were noted to be significant higher in group 2 compared to group 1. Clustering of cardiovascular risk factors suggesting metabolic syndrome was also much higher in group 2 (60.5 vs 39.7% p value = 0.012). Impaired glucose tolerance was significantly higher in group 2 (73.3 vs 28.6 p < 0.001) denoting more glycemia. Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was significantly higher in group 2 (p = 0.001). Beta cell function (HOMA-β) was also higher in group 2 but not statistically significant (p = 110). In IFG, the higher range of blood sugar 111 to 125 mg/dl is associated with more glycemia, cardiovascular risk factors and insulin resistance. Beta cell function though higher in this group is inadequate to compensate for higher insulin resistance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)94-99
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2019

Fingerprint

Fasting
Glucose
Insulin Resistance
Homeostasis
Hypertension
Glucose Intolerance
Glucose Tolerance Test
Cluster Analysis
Blood Glucose
Comorbidity
Software
Cross-Sectional Studies
History
Insulin
Lipids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Khan, Zohaib Abdul Wadood ; Vidyasagar, Sudha ; Varma, Dantuluru Muralidhar ; Nandakrishna, B. ; Holla, Avinash ; V.S, Binu. / The clinical and biochemical profiles of patients with IFG. In: International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries. 2019 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 94-99.
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The clinical and biochemical profiles of patients with IFG. / Khan, Zohaib Abdul Wadood; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Varma, Dantuluru Muralidhar; Nandakrishna, B.; Holla, Avinash; V.S, Binu.

In: International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 94-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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