The evaluation of nitric oxide scavenging activity of certain Indian medicinal plants in vitro

A preliminary study

Ganesh Chandra Jagetia, Manjeshwar Shrinath Baliga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

133 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The plant extracts of 17 commonly used Indian medicinal plants were examined for their possible regulatory effect on nitric oxide (NO) levels using sodium nitroprusside as an NO donor in vitro. Most of the plant extracts tested demonstrated direct scavenging of NO and exhibited significant activity. The potency of scavenging activity was in the following order: Alstonia scholaris > Cynodon dactylon > Morinda citrifolia > Tylophora indica > Tectona grandis > Aegle marmelos (leaf) > Momordica charantia > Phyllanthus niruri > Ocimum sanctum > Tinospora cordifolia (hexane extract) = Coleus ambonicus > Vitex negundo (alcoholic) > T. cordifolia (dichloromethane extract) > T. cordifolia (methanol extract) > Ipomoea digitata > V. negundo (aqueous) > Boerhaavia diffusa > Eugenia jambolana (seed) > T. cordifolia (aqueous extract) > V. negundo (dichloromethane/methanol extract) > Gingko biloba > Picrorrhiza kurroa > A. marmelos (fruit) > Santalum album > E. jambolana (leaf). All the extracts evaluated exhibited a dose-dependent NO scavenging activity. The A. scholaris bark showed its greatest NO scavenging effect of 81.86% at 250 μg/mL, as compared with G. biloba, where 54.9% scavenging was observed at a similar concentration. The present results suggest that these medicinal plants might be potent and novel therapeutic agents for scavenging of NO and the regulation of pathological conditions caused by excessive generation of NO and its oxidation product, peroxynitrite.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)343-348
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Medicinal Food
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-09-2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medicinal Plants
nitric oxide
medicinal plants
Tinospora cordifolia
Nitric Oxide
Vitex negundo
Alstonia
Aegle
extracts
Alstonia scholaris
Syzygium
Ginkgo biloba
Aegle marmelos
Syzygium cumini
Methylene Chloride
Plant Extracts
methylene chloride
Methanol
Tylophora
Picrorhiza

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra ; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath. / The evaluation of nitric oxide scavenging activity of certain Indian medicinal plants in vitro : A preliminary study. In: Journal of Medicinal Food. 2004 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 343-348.
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The evaluation of nitric oxide scavenging activity of certain Indian medicinal plants in vitro : A preliminary study. / Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath.

In: Journal of Medicinal Food, Vol. 7, No. 3, 01.09.2004, p. 343-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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