The feasibility of preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV using peer counselors in Zimbabwe

Avinash K. Shetty, Caroline Marangwanda, Lynda Stranix-Chibanda, Winfreda Chandisarewa, Elizabeth Chirapa, Agnes Mahomva, Anna Miller, Micah Simoyi, Yvonne Maldonado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) is a major public health challenge in Zimbabwe. Methods: Using trained peer counselors, a nevirapine (NVP)-based PMTCT program was implemented as part of routine care in urban antenatal clinics. Results: Between October 2002 and December 2004, a total of 19,279 women presented for antenatal care. Of these, 18,817 (98%) underwent pre-test counseling; 10,513 (56%) accepted HIV testing, of whom 1986 (19%) were HIV-infected. Overall, 9696 (92%) of women collected results and received individual post-test counseling. Only 288 men opted for HIV testing. Of the 1807 HIV-infected women who received posttest counseling, 1387 (77%) collected NVP tablet and 727 (40%) delivered at the clinics. Of the 1986 HIV-infected women, 691 (35%) received NVPsd at onset of labor, and 615 (31%) infants received NVPsd. Of the 727 HIV-infected women who delivered in the clinics, only 396 women returned to the clinic with their infants for the 6-week follow-up visit; of these mothers, 258 (59%) joined support groups and 234 (53%) opted for contraception. By the end of the study period, 209 (53%) of mother-infant pairs (n = 396) came to the clinic for at least 3 follow-up visits. Conclusion: Despite considerable challenges and limited resources, it was feasible to implement a PMTCT program using peer counselors in urban clinics in Zimbabwe.

Original languageEnglish
Article number17
JournalAIDS Research and Therapy
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-08-2008
Externally publishedYes

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Zimbabwe
Mothers
HIV
Nevirapine
Counseling
Labor Onset
Counselors
Prenatal Care
Self-Help Groups
Contraception
Tablets
Public Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Virology

Cite this

Shetty, A. K., Marangwanda, C., Stranix-Chibanda, L., Chandisarewa, W., Chirapa, E., Mahomva, A., ... Maldonado, Y. (2008). The feasibility of preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV using peer counselors in Zimbabwe. AIDS Research and Therapy, 5, [17]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-6405-5-17
Shetty, Avinash K. ; Marangwanda, Caroline ; Stranix-Chibanda, Lynda ; Chandisarewa, Winfreda ; Chirapa, Elizabeth ; Mahomva, Agnes ; Miller, Anna ; Simoyi, Micah ; Maldonado, Yvonne. / The feasibility of preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV using peer counselors in Zimbabwe. In: AIDS Research and Therapy. 2008 ; Vol. 5.
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abstract = "Background: Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) is a major public health challenge in Zimbabwe. Methods: Using trained peer counselors, a nevirapine (NVP)-based PMTCT program was implemented as part of routine care in urban antenatal clinics. Results: Between October 2002 and December 2004, a total of 19,279 women presented for antenatal care. Of these, 18,817 (98{\%}) underwent pre-test counseling; 10,513 (56{\%}) accepted HIV testing, of whom 1986 (19{\%}) were HIV-infected. Overall, 9696 (92{\%}) of women collected results and received individual post-test counseling. Only 288 men opted for HIV testing. Of the 1807 HIV-infected women who received posttest counseling, 1387 (77{\%}) collected NVP tablet and 727 (40{\%}) delivered at the clinics. Of the 1986 HIV-infected women, 691 (35{\%}) received NVPsd at onset of labor, and 615 (31{\%}) infants received NVPsd. Of the 727 HIV-infected women who delivered in the clinics, only 396 women returned to the clinic with their infants for the 6-week follow-up visit; of these mothers, 258 (59{\%}) joined support groups and 234 (53{\%}) opted for contraception. By the end of the study period, 209 (53{\%}) of mother-infant pairs (n = 396) came to the clinic for at least 3 follow-up visits. Conclusion: Despite considerable challenges and limited resources, it was feasible to implement a PMTCT program using peer counselors in urban clinics in Zimbabwe.",
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Shetty, AK, Marangwanda, C, Stranix-Chibanda, L, Chandisarewa, W, Chirapa, E, Mahomva, A, Miller, A, Simoyi, M & Maldonado, Y 2008, 'The feasibility of preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV using peer counselors in Zimbabwe', AIDS Research and Therapy, vol. 5, 17. https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-6405-5-17

The feasibility of preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV using peer counselors in Zimbabwe. / Shetty, Avinash K.; Marangwanda, Caroline; Stranix-Chibanda, Lynda; Chandisarewa, Winfreda; Chirapa, Elizabeth; Mahomva, Agnes; Miller, Anna; Simoyi, Micah; Maldonado, Yvonne.

In: AIDS Research and Therapy, Vol. 5, 17, 01.08.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - The feasibility of preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV using peer counselors in Zimbabwe

AU - Shetty, Avinash K.

AU - Marangwanda, Caroline

AU - Stranix-Chibanda, Lynda

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AU - Chirapa, Elizabeth

AU - Mahomva, Agnes

AU - Miller, Anna

AU - Simoyi, Micah

AU - Maldonado, Yvonne

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N2 - Background: Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) is a major public health challenge in Zimbabwe. Methods: Using trained peer counselors, a nevirapine (NVP)-based PMTCT program was implemented as part of routine care in urban antenatal clinics. Results: Between October 2002 and December 2004, a total of 19,279 women presented for antenatal care. Of these, 18,817 (98%) underwent pre-test counseling; 10,513 (56%) accepted HIV testing, of whom 1986 (19%) were HIV-infected. Overall, 9696 (92%) of women collected results and received individual post-test counseling. Only 288 men opted for HIV testing. Of the 1807 HIV-infected women who received posttest counseling, 1387 (77%) collected NVP tablet and 727 (40%) delivered at the clinics. Of the 1986 HIV-infected women, 691 (35%) received NVPsd at onset of labor, and 615 (31%) infants received NVPsd. Of the 727 HIV-infected women who delivered in the clinics, only 396 women returned to the clinic with their infants for the 6-week follow-up visit; of these mothers, 258 (59%) joined support groups and 234 (53%) opted for contraception. By the end of the study period, 209 (53%) of mother-infant pairs (n = 396) came to the clinic for at least 3 follow-up visits. Conclusion: Despite considerable challenges and limited resources, it was feasible to implement a PMTCT program using peer counselors in urban clinics in Zimbabwe.

AB - Background: Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) is a major public health challenge in Zimbabwe. Methods: Using trained peer counselors, a nevirapine (NVP)-based PMTCT program was implemented as part of routine care in urban antenatal clinics. Results: Between October 2002 and December 2004, a total of 19,279 women presented for antenatal care. Of these, 18,817 (98%) underwent pre-test counseling; 10,513 (56%) accepted HIV testing, of whom 1986 (19%) were HIV-infected. Overall, 9696 (92%) of women collected results and received individual post-test counseling. Only 288 men opted for HIV testing. Of the 1807 HIV-infected women who received posttest counseling, 1387 (77%) collected NVP tablet and 727 (40%) delivered at the clinics. Of the 1986 HIV-infected women, 691 (35%) received NVPsd at onset of labor, and 615 (31%) infants received NVPsd. Of the 727 HIV-infected women who delivered in the clinics, only 396 women returned to the clinic with their infants for the 6-week follow-up visit; of these mothers, 258 (59%) joined support groups and 234 (53%) opted for contraception. By the end of the study period, 209 (53%) of mother-infant pairs (n = 396) came to the clinic for at least 3 follow-up visits. Conclusion: Despite considerable challenges and limited resources, it was feasible to implement a PMTCT program using peer counselors in urban clinics in Zimbabwe.

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Shetty AK, Marangwanda C, Stranix-Chibanda L, Chandisarewa W, Chirapa E, Mahomva A et al. The feasibility of preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV using peer counselors in Zimbabwe. AIDS Research and Therapy. 2008 Aug 1;5. 17. https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-6405-5-17