Treatment-seeking behavior and obstacles to treatment compliance in diabetic patients in Mangaluru, India

Shannon M. Mentock, Vanessa Y. Ng, Rashmi Narayana, Harshini Ullal, Suchetha Kumari, Sanjeev Badiger, Avinash K. Shetty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim To evaluate the local treatment-seeking behaviors of diabetics with a focus on the root causes of culture-specific barriers to treatment compliance and define targets for intervention. Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered in the local language to 204 diabetic adults in rural and urban clinical settings. Fasting blood glucose level was measured in all participants prior to the survey. Questions included sociodemographic characteristics, treatment-seeking behavior, and perceptions of obstacles. Results Out of 204 participants, predictors of at target status included age (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02–1.11) and rural living area (OR 1.92, 92% CI 1.02–3.60). Participants were commonly diagnosed with symptoms of diabetes (44.6%). Participants demonstrated frequent healthcare provider contact (51% in last one month, 74.5% in last three months). Accidental or purposeful deviation from the recommended medications or treatment plan was reported by 18.7% and 12.8%, respectively. From the sample, 111 participants (54.4%) were capable of receiving SMS messages and 79 (71.1%) were willing to receive messages about diabetes. The most frequently self-reported obstacles to diabetes management were: medication costs (49.3%), treatment costs (46.6%), diabetic diet (33.8%), lack of relief on current treatment (17.4%), and transportation (16.7%). Conclusion Though most diabetics have frequent encounters with healthcare providers and report compliant behaviors, the majority do not meet recommended diabetes management guidelines. Screening of at-risk populations, targeted SMS campaigns, or diabetes-specific training for healthcare providers may improve clinical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S617-S622
JournalDiabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-12-2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

India
Health Personnel
Diabetic Diet
Therapeutics
Health Care Costs
Cooperative Behavior
Blood Glucose
Fasting
Language
Cross-Sectional Studies
Guidelines
Costs and Cost Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Mentock, Shannon M. ; Ng, Vanessa Y. ; Narayana, Rashmi ; Ullal, Harshini ; Kumari, Suchetha ; Badiger, Sanjeev ; Shetty, Avinash K. / Treatment-seeking behavior and obstacles to treatment compliance in diabetic patients in Mangaluru, India. In: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews. 2017 ; Vol. 11. pp. S617-S622.
@article{9ee6f39c54754f2cb94f9d948ba8ab31,
title = "Treatment-seeking behavior and obstacles to treatment compliance in diabetic patients in Mangaluru, India",
abstract = "Aim To evaluate the local treatment-seeking behaviors of diabetics with a focus on the root causes of culture-specific barriers to treatment compliance and define targets for intervention. Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered in the local language to 204 diabetic adults in rural and urban clinical settings. Fasting blood glucose level was measured in all participants prior to the survey. Questions included sociodemographic characteristics, treatment-seeking behavior, and perceptions of obstacles. Results Out of 204 participants, predictors of at target status included age (OR 1.06, 95{\%} CI 1.02–1.11) and rural living area (OR 1.92, 92{\%} CI 1.02–3.60). Participants were commonly diagnosed with symptoms of diabetes (44.6{\%}). Participants demonstrated frequent healthcare provider contact (51{\%} in last one month, 74.5{\%} in last three months). Accidental or purposeful deviation from the recommended medications or treatment plan was reported by 18.7{\%} and 12.8{\%}, respectively. From the sample, 111 participants (54.4{\%}) were capable of receiving SMS messages and 79 (71.1{\%}) were willing to receive messages about diabetes. The most frequently self-reported obstacles to diabetes management were: medication costs (49.3{\%}), treatment costs (46.6{\%}), diabetic diet (33.8{\%}), lack of relief on current treatment (17.4{\%}), and transportation (16.7{\%}). Conclusion Though most diabetics have frequent encounters with healthcare providers and report compliant behaviors, the majority do not meet recommended diabetes management guidelines. Screening of at-risk populations, targeted SMS campaigns, or diabetes-specific training for healthcare providers may improve clinical outcomes.",
author = "Mentock, {Shannon M.} and Ng, {Vanessa Y.} and Rashmi Narayana and Harshini Ullal and Suchetha Kumari and Sanjeev Badiger and Shetty, {Avinash K.}",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.dsx.2017.04.014",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "S617--S622",
journal = "Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews",
issn = "1871-4021",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

Treatment-seeking behavior and obstacles to treatment compliance in diabetic patients in Mangaluru, India. / Mentock, Shannon M.; Ng, Vanessa Y.; Narayana, Rashmi; Ullal, Harshini; Kumari, Suchetha; Badiger, Sanjeev; Shetty, Avinash K.

In: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews, Vol. 11, 01.12.2017, p. S617-S622.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Treatment-seeking behavior and obstacles to treatment compliance in diabetic patients in Mangaluru, India

AU - Mentock, Shannon M.

AU - Ng, Vanessa Y.

AU - Narayana, Rashmi

AU - Ullal, Harshini

AU - Kumari, Suchetha

AU - Badiger, Sanjeev

AU - Shetty, Avinash K.

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - Aim To evaluate the local treatment-seeking behaviors of diabetics with a focus on the root causes of culture-specific barriers to treatment compliance and define targets for intervention. Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered in the local language to 204 diabetic adults in rural and urban clinical settings. Fasting blood glucose level was measured in all participants prior to the survey. Questions included sociodemographic characteristics, treatment-seeking behavior, and perceptions of obstacles. Results Out of 204 participants, predictors of at target status included age (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02–1.11) and rural living area (OR 1.92, 92% CI 1.02–3.60). Participants were commonly diagnosed with symptoms of diabetes (44.6%). Participants demonstrated frequent healthcare provider contact (51% in last one month, 74.5% in last three months). Accidental or purposeful deviation from the recommended medications or treatment plan was reported by 18.7% and 12.8%, respectively. From the sample, 111 participants (54.4%) were capable of receiving SMS messages and 79 (71.1%) were willing to receive messages about diabetes. The most frequently self-reported obstacles to diabetes management were: medication costs (49.3%), treatment costs (46.6%), diabetic diet (33.8%), lack of relief on current treatment (17.4%), and transportation (16.7%). Conclusion Though most diabetics have frequent encounters with healthcare providers and report compliant behaviors, the majority do not meet recommended diabetes management guidelines. Screening of at-risk populations, targeted SMS campaigns, or diabetes-specific training for healthcare providers may improve clinical outcomes.

AB - Aim To evaluate the local treatment-seeking behaviors of diabetics with a focus on the root causes of culture-specific barriers to treatment compliance and define targets for intervention. Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered in the local language to 204 diabetic adults in rural and urban clinical settings. Fasting blood glucose level was measured in all participants prior to the survey. Questions included sociodemographic characteristics, treatment-seeking behavior, and perceptions of obstacles. Results Out of 204 participants, predictors of at target status included age (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02–1.11) and rural living area (OR 1.92, 92% CI 1.02–3.60). Participants were commonly diagnosed with symptoms of diabetes (44.6%). Participants demonstrated frequent healthcare provider contact (51% in last one month, 74.5% in last three months). Accidental or purposeful deviation from the recommended medications or treatment plan was reported by 18.7% and 12.8%, respectively. From the sample, 111 participants (54.4%) were capable of receiving SMS messages and 79 (71.1%) were willing to receive messages about diabetes. The most frequently self-reported obstacles to diabetes management were: medication costs (49.3%), treatment costs (46.6%), diabetic diet (33.8%), lack of relief on current treatment (17.4%), and transportation (16.7%). Conclusion Though most diabetics have frequent encounters with healthcare providers and report compliant behaviors, the majority do not meet recommended diabetes management guidelines. Screening of at-risk populations, targeted SMS campaigns, or diabetes-specific training for healthcare providers may improve clinical outcomes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85018346699&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85018346699&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.dsx.2017.04.014

DO - 10.1016/j.dsx.2017.04.014

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85018346699

VL - 11

SP - S617-S622

JO - Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews

JF - Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews

SN - 1871-4021

ER -