Triple falx cerebelli associated with two aberrant venous sinuses in the floor of posterior cranial fossa

B. Satheesha Nayak, Srinivasa Rao Sirasanagandla, R. Deepthinath, Naveen Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

During regular dissection classes, we came across tripled falx cerebelli in a male cadaver. The main (middle) falx cerebelli was large and was attached to the internal occipital crest. It contained the occipital sinus. There were two smaller folds (right and left), one on either side of the falx cerebelli. There were two aberrant venous sinuses; each one connecting the ipsilateral sigmoid and transverse sinuses with each other. The complex dural-venous variation reported here is seldom reported in the literature. Knowledge of such variation is important for neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists as these aberrant folds could cause haemorrhage during suboccipital approaches or may lead to erroneous interpretation during imaging of the posterior cranial fossa.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)397-400
Number of pages4
JournalAustralasian Medical Journal
Volume6
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Posterior Cranial Fossa
Dura Mater
Transverse Sinuses
Sigmoid Colon
Cadaver
Dissection
Hemorrhage

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "During regular dissection classes, we came across tripled falx cerebelli in a male cadaver. The main (middle) falx cerebelli was large and was attached to the internal occipital crest. It contained the occipital sinus. There were two smaller folds (right and left), one on either side of the falx cerebelli. There were two aberrant venous sinuses; each one connecting the ipsilateral sigmoid and transverse sinuses with each other. The complex dural-venous variation reported here is seldom reported in the literature. Knowledge of such variation is important for neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists as these aberrant folds could cause haemorrhage during suboccipital approaches or may lead to erroneous interpretation during imaging of the posterior cranial fossa.",
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Triple falx cerebelli associated with two aberrant venous sinuses in the floor of posterior cranial fossa. / Satheesha Nayak, B.; Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa Rao; Deepthinath, R.; Kumar, Naveen.

In: Australasian Medical Journal, Vol. 6, No. 8, 2013, p. 397-400.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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