Unusually large mastoid antrum ('mega antrum')

K. R. Puranik, P. S.N. Murthy, R. Gopalakrishna, D. R. Nayak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients who present with a unilateral non-tender bony swelling in the mastoid region without any clinical evidence of middle ear infection could be diagnosed as having a fibrous or bony lesion affecting the temporal bone. In such cases, if there is radiological evidence of large lucent area in the mastoid antrum without any bony dehiscence one should keep in mind in the differential diagnosis a mega antrum in addition to congenital cholesteatoma and eosinophilic granuloma. A large lytic lesion the mastoid segment of the temporal bone with an intact tympanic membrane therefore presents a diagnostic dilemma. A case of an unusually large mastoid antrum in an young adult with no middle ear suppuration and a cosmetically unacceptable swelling behind the ear is prevented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)164-165
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Laryngology and Otology
Volume106
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-1992

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Mastoid
Temporal Bone
Middle Ear
Eosinophilic Granuloma
Tympanic Membrane
Suppuration
Ear
Young Adult
Differential Diagnosis
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Puranik, K. R. ; Murthy, P. S.N. ; Gopalakrishna, R. ; Nayak, D. R. / Unusually large mastoid antrum ('mega antrum'). In: Journal of Laryngology and Otology. 1992 ; Vol. 106, No. 2. pp. 164-165.
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Unusually large mastoid antrum ('mega antrum'). / Puranik, K. R.; Murthy, P. S.N.; Gopalakrishna, R.; Nayak, D. R.

In: Journal of Laryngology and Otology, Vol. 106, No. 2, 01.01.1992, p. 164-165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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